The role of epigenetics in mediating environmental effects on phenotype

Morgan, Daniel K. and Whitelaw, Emma (2009). The role of epigenetics in mediating environmental effects on phenotype. In: Satish C. Kalhan, Andrew M. Prentice and Chittaranjan S. Yajnik, Emerging Societies: Coexistence of Childhood Malnutrition and Obesity. 63rd Nestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop, Pediatric Program: Proceedings. NNIW63: 63rd Nestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop, New Delhi, India, (109-119). 30 March-3 April, 2008. doi:10.1159/000209976


Author Morgan, Daniel K.
Whitelaw, Emma
Title of paper The role of epigenetics in mediating environmental effects on phenotype
Conference name NNIW63: 63rd Nestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop
Conference location New Delhi, India
Conference dates 30 March-3 April, 2008
Proceedings title Emerging Societies: Coexistence of Childhood Malnutrition and Obesity. 63rd Nestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop, Pediatric Program: Proceedings   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Nestle Nutrition Institute Workshop Series   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Basel, Switzerland
Publisher S. Karger
Publication Year 2009
Year available 2008
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1159/000209976
ISBN 9783805590099
9783805590105
ISSN 1661-6677
1662-3878
Editor Satish C. Kalhan
Andrew M. Prentice
Chittaranjan S. Yajnik
Volume 63
Start page 109
End page 119
Total pages 11
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Epigenetics is being suggested as a possible interface between the genetic and environmental factors that together give rise to phenotype. In mice there exists a group of genes, known as metastable epialleles, which are sensitive to environmental influences, such as diet, and undergo molecular changes that, once established, remain for the life of the individual. These modifications are epigenetic and in some cases they survive across generations, that is, through meiosis. This is termed transgenerational epigenetic inheritance. These findings have led to the idea that similar processes might occur in humans. Although it is clear that the lifestyle of one generation can significantly influence the health of the next generation in humans, in the absence of supporting molecular data it is hard to justify the notion that this is the result of transgenerational epigenetic inheritance. What is required first is to ascertain whether genes of this type, that is genes that are sensitive to the epigenetic state, even exist in humans.
Subjects 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
2735 Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
2916 Nutrition and Dietetics
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 11 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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