Breaking the connection: why is it so difficult to talk about discharge with our clients with aphasia?

Hersh, Deborah (2009). Breaking the connection: why is it so difficult to talk about discharge with our clients with aphasia?. In: Selected papers from the 2008 joint Speech Pathology Australia and New Zealand Speech-Language Therapists' Association National Conference. 2008 Reflecting Connections: 2nd Joint Conference between New Zealand Speech-Language Therapists Association and Speech Pathology Australia, Auckland, New Zealand, (147-154). 25-29 May, 2008. doi:10.1080/17549500802579103


Author Hersh, Deborah
Title of paper Breaking the connection: why is it so difficult to talk about discharge with our clients with aphasia?
Conference name 2008 Reflecting Connections: 2nd Joint Conference between New Zealand Speech-Language Therapists Association and Speech Pathology Australia
Conference location Auckland, New Zealand
Conference dates 25-29 May, 2008
Proceedings title Selected papers from the 2008 joint Speech Pathology Australia and New Zealand Speech-Language Therapists' Association National Conference   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Informa Healthcare
Publication Year 2009
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1080/17549500802579103
Open Access Status
ISSN 1754-9507
1754-9515
Volume 11
Issue 2
Start page 147
End page 154
Total pages 8
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
This paper, drawn from a study into experiences of treatment termination in chronic aphasia, discusses why communication, between speech-language pathologists and clients with aphasia, breaks down so frequently during discharge negotiations. Considering our role as communication experts and our awareness of the barriers faced by people with aphasia in sharing decisions about their care, this is a concern. Eight general reasons for communication breakdown are discussed: the presence of aphasia; inadequate explanations or shared understandings of therapy in general; discharge reflecting other aspects of professional-client communication; discharge as “bad news”; discharge and the limits to negotiation; discharge as an unclear phenomenon; discharge documentation; and discharge evaluation. These reasons are illustrated by several real stories gathered from in-depth interviews with 30 speech-language pathologists, 21 people with aphasia and 16 family members. This paper aims to help speech-language pathologists reflect on how they break the connection, so important in therapy, between themselves and their clients with aphasia at discharge and how this is communicated. This issue is important, not only because of the centrality of communication to our work, but also because it has implications for the overall success of therapy and for our clients' wellbeing.
Subjects 2733 Otorhinolaryngology
2912 LPN and LVN
2922 Research and Theory
3616 Speech and Hearing
Keyword Communication breakdown
Discharge
Aphasia therapy
Therapeutic relationship
Qualitative research
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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