Malaria's indirect contribution to all-cause mortality in the Andaman Islands during the colonial era

Shanks, G. Dennis, Hay, Simon I. and Bradley, David J. (2008) Malaria's indirect contribution to all-cause mortality in the Andaman Islands during the colonial era. The Lancet Infectious Diseases, 8 9: 564-570. doi:10.1016/S1473-3099(08)70130-0


Author Shanks, G. Dennis
Hay, Simon I.
Bradley, David J.
Title Malaria's indirect contribution to all-cause mortality in the Andaman Islands during the colonial era
Journal name The Lancet Infectious Diseases   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1473-3099
1474-4457
Publication date 2008
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/S1473-3099(08)70130-0
Open Access Status
Volume 8
Issue 9
Start page 564
End page 570
Total pages 7
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher The Lancet Publishing Group
Abstract Malaria has a substantial secondary effect on other causes of mortality. From the 19th century, malaria epidemics in the Andaman Islands' penal colony were initiated by the brackish swamp-breeding malaria vector Anopheles sundaicus and fuelled by the importation of new prisoners. Malaria was a major determinant of the highly variable all-cause mortality rate (correlation coefficient r2=0·60, n=68, p<0·0001) from 1872 to 1939. Directly attributed malaria mortality based on post-mortem examinations rarely exceeded one-fifth of total mortality. Infectious diseases such as pneumonia, tuberculosis, dysentery, and diarrhoea, which combined with malaria made up the majority of all-cause mortality, were positively correlated with malaria incidence over several decades. Deaths secondary to malaria (indirect malaria mortality) were at least as great as mortality directly attributed to malaria infections.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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