Identification of human-to-human transmissibility factors in PB2 proteins of influenza A by large-scale mutual information analysis

Miotto, Olivo, Heiny, A. T., Tan, Tin Wee, August, J. Thomas and Brusic, Vladimir (2008) Identification of human-to-human transmissibility factors in PB2 proteins of influenza A by large-scale mutual information analysis. BMC Bioinformatics, 9 Supp. 1: . doi:10.1186/1471-2105-9-S1-S18


Author Miotto, Olivo
Heiny, A. T.
Tan, Tin Wee
August, J. Thomas
Brusic, Vladimir
Title Identification of human-to-human transmissibility factors in PB2 proteins of influenza A by large-scale mutual information analysis
Journal name BMC Bioinformatics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1471-2105
Publication date 2008-02-13
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/1471-2105-9-S1-S18
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 9
Issue Supp. 1
Total pages 18
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background
The identification of mutations that confer unique properties to a pathogen, such as host range, is of fundamental importance in the fight against disease. This paper describes a novel method for identifying amino acid sites that distinguish specific sets of protein sequences, by comparative analysis of matched alignments. The use of mutual information to identify distinctive residues responsible for functional variants makes this approach highly suitable for analyzing large sets of sequences. To support mutual information analysis, we developed the AVANA software, which utilizes sequence annotations to select sets for comparison, according to user-specified criteria. The method presented was applied to an analysis of influenza A PB2 protein sequences, with the objective of identifying the components of adaptation to human-to-human transmission, and reconstructing the mutation history of these components.

Results
We compared over 3,000 PB2 protein sequences of human-transmissible and avian isolates, to produce a catalogue of sites involved in adaptation to human-to-human transmission. This analysis identified 17 characteristic sites, five of which have been present in human-transmissible strains since the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic. Sixteen of these sites are located in functional domains, suggesting they may play functional roles in host-range specificity. The catalogue of characteristic sites was used to derive sequence signatures from historical isolates. These signatures, arranged in chronological order, reveal an evolutionary timeline for the adaptation of the PB2 protein to human hosts.

Conclusion
By providing the most complete elucidation to date of the functional components participating in PB2 protein adaptation to humans, this study demonstrates that mutual information is a powerful tool for comparative characterization of sequence sets. In addition to confirming previously reported findings, several novel characteristic sites within PB2 are reported. Sequence signatures generated using the characteristic sites catalogue characterize concisely the adaptation characteristics of individual isolates. Evolutionary timelines derived from signatures of early human influenza isolates suggest that characteristic variants emerged rapidly, and remained remarkably stable through subsequent pandemics. In addition, the signatures of human-infecting H5N1 isolates suggest that this avian subtype has low pandemic potential at present, although it presents more human adaptation components than most avian subtypes.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article number S18

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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