Identification of cadmium chemical form in environmental samples and significance for human health risk assessment

Taga, R,, Ng, J,, Harris, H., Aitken, J., Zheng, J. and Noller, B. (2013). Identification of cadmium chemical form in environmental samples and significance for human health risk assessment. In: Magdi Selim and John Seaman, ICOBTE 2013: Proceedings of the International Conference on The Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements. ICOBTE 2013: 12th International Conference on the Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements, Athens, GA, USA, (502-503). 16-20 June, 2013.

Author Taga, R,
Ng, J,
Harris, H.
Aitken, J.
Zheng, J.
Noller, B.
Title of paper Identification of cadmium chemical form in environmental samples and significance for human health risk assessment
Conference name ICOBTE 2013: 12th International Conference on the Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements
Conference location Athens, GA, USA
Conference dates 16-20 June, 2013
Proceedings title ICOBTE 2013: Proceedings of the International Conference on The Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements
Place of Publication Madison, WI, USA
Publisher Omnipress
Publication Year 2013
Sub-type Published abstract
Editor Magdi Selim
John Seaman
Start page 502
End page 503
Total pages 2
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Cadmium occurs naturally in association with zinc mineralisation but is generally present at concentrations that are below 5000 mg Cd/kg. Generally the cadmium mineral form in mineralisation is undetectable by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and not commonly identified. Under rare circumstances cadmium minerals occur in crystallized forms and have been found. Greenockite (CdS), the mineral form of cadmium sulfide (CdS) has been identified in various zinc mineral deposits in a discrete crystalline form associated with sphalerite (zinc sulfide ZnS). Even rarer is Otavite, the mineral form of cadmium carbonate that can be found in zincated carbonate formations. An alternative approach to examine cadmium chemical form in mineralisation and environmental samples uses synchrotron – based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) which has sufficient sensitivity to detect environmental levels of cadmium (down to 20 mg/kg) and enables chemical structure to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to utilize XAS and X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) technique to explain the chemical form of cadmium in environmental samples that may be relevant to the health risk assessment process...
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Presented during the Technical Session "Soil Mapping/Characterization" as Abstract #420.

 
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Created: Mon, 25 Nov 2013, 11:47:07 EST by Dr Barry Noller on behalf of Centre For Mined Land Rehabilitation