The relationship between resilience and personality traits in doctors: implications for enhancing well being.

Eley, Diann S., Cloninger, C. Robert, Walters, Lucie, Laurence, Caroline, Synnott, Robyn and Wilkinson, David (2013) The relationship between resilience and personality traits in doctors: implications for enhancing well being.. PeerJ, 1 e216: 1-16. doi:10.7717/peerj.216


Author Eley, Diann S.
Cloninger, C. Robert
Walters, Lucie
Laurence, Caroline
Synnott, Robyn
Wilkinson, David
Title The relationship between resilience and personality traits in doctors: implications for enhancing well being.
Journal name PeerJ   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2167-8359
Publication date 2013-11-19
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.7717/peerj.216
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 1
Issue e216
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher PeerJ
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective. The health and well being of medical doctors is vital to their longevity and safe practice. The concept of resilience is recognised as a key component of well being and is an important factor in medical training to help doctors learn to cope with challenge, stress, and adversity. This study examined the relationship of resilience to personality traits and resilience in doctors in order to identify the key traits that promote or impair resilience.

Methods. A cross sectional cohort of 479 family practitioners in practice across Australia was studied. The Temperament and Character Inventory measured levels of the seven basic dimensions of personality and the Resilience Scale provided an overall measure of resilience. The associations between resilience and personality were examined by Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients, controlling for age and gender (α = 0.05 with an accompanying 95% confidence level) and multiple regression analyses.

Results. Strong to medium positive correlations were found between Resilience and Self-directedness (r = .614, p < .01), Persistence (r = .498, p < .01), and Cooperativeness (r = .363, p < .01) and negative with Harm Avoidance (r = .−555, p < .01). Individual differences in personality explained 39% of the variance in resilience [F(7, 460) = 38.40, p < .001]. The three traits which contributed significantly to this variance were Self-directedness (β = .33, p < .001), Persistence (β = .22, p < .001) and Harm Avoidance (β = .19, p < .001).

Conclusion. Resilience was associated with a personality trait pattern that is mature, responsible, optimistic, persevering, and cooperative. Findings support the inclusion of resilience as a component of optimal functioning and well being in doctors. Strategies for enhancing resilience should consider the key traits that drive or impair it.
Keyword Temperament
Resilience
Character
Well being
Doctors
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 17 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 25 Nov 2013, 11:05:34 EST by Diann Eley on behalf of School of Medicine