Changes in physical functioning over 6 years in older women: effects of sitting time and physical activity

Peeters, Geeske, Lips, Paul and Brown, Wendy J. (2014) Changes in physical functioning over 6 years in older women: effects of sitting time and physical activity. European Journal of Ageing, 11 3: 205-212. doi:10.1007/s10433-013-0300-x

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Author Peeters, Geeske
Lips, Paul
Brown, Wendy J.
Title Changes in physical functioning over 6 years in older women: effects of sitting time and physical activity
Journal name European Journal of Ageing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1613-9372
1613-9380
Publication date 2014-09
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10433-013-0300-x
Open Access Status
Volume 11
Issue 3
Start page 205
End page 212
Total pages 8
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Abstract The combined effects of physical activity (PA) and sitting time (ST) on physical functioning (PF) may be stronger than for each factor separately. This study examined associations between ST, PA, and PF over 6 years in older women. Data were from 6,611 participants in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (mean age 78 ± 1.5 years). Activity pattern at baseline (2002) was categorized as one of 12 combinations of ST (<4, 4-7, or ≥8 h/day) and PA (<40, 40-450, 450-900, or ≥900 MET min/week). PF was measured using the SF-36 (range 0-100) in 2002, 2005, and 2008. General estimating equations for linear regression were used with adjustment for confounders. Baseline PF ranged from 40 to 74 in the least to the most active groups. PF was 6.3 (95 % confidence interval [CI] -7.6 to -5.0) points lower in participants sitting ≥8 h/day than in participants sitting <4 h/day, and 16.9 (CI 15.7-18.0) points higher in participants reporting ≥900 MET min/week than in participants reporting <40 MET min/week PA. Compared with the least active pattern, those in the most active pattern scored 24.5 (CI 22.5-26.4) points higher. The decline over 6 years was greater in the more active categories: 5 and 16 points in the least and most active categories. In conclusion, in women, both high physical activity and low sitting time are important for establishing a certain level of PF prior to age 76-81, but do not protect against decline in PF over time later in life. The combined effect of ST and PA did not differ from their individual effects on PF.
Keyword Old age
Physical activity
Physical functioning
Sedentary behaviour
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 30 October 2013.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 24 Nov 2013, 16:28:20 EST by Deborah Noon on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences