The mechanical significance of morphological variation in the macaque mandibular symphysis during mastication

Panagiotopoulou, Olga and Cobb, Samuel N. (2011) The mechanical significance of morphological variation in the macaque mandibular symphysis during mastication. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 146 2: 253-261. doi:10.1002/ajpa.21573


Author Panagiotopoulou, Olga
Cobb, Samuel N.
Title The mechanical significance of morphological variation in the macaque mandibular symphysis during mastication
Journal name American Journal of Physical Anthropology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0002-9483
1096-8644
Publication date 2011-10
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/ajpa.21573
Open Access Status
Volume 146
Issue 2
Start page 253
End page 261
Total pages 9
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Catarrhine symphyseal morphology displays considerable variation. Although this has been related to dentition, phylogeny, sexual dimorphism, and facial orientation, most emphasis has been given to the functional significance of the symphysis to mechanical loading during mastication. The current state of knowledge regarding the mechanical significance of the symphysis is based on a combination of in vivo experimental and comparative studies on Macaca fascicularis. These approaches have provided considerable insight into the stereotypical patterns of loading in the symphyseal region during chewing and hypotheses related to the associated symphyseal morphologies. Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to assess how in silico manipulation translates into the mechanical loading hypotheses previously proposed experimentally. In particular, this study tests the form-function relationship of the symphysis of an adult M. fascicularis mandible during lateral transverse bending and dorsoventral shear of the mandibular symphysis, and a series of modified hypothetical morphologies including absence/presence of tori and variation in the inclination and depth of the symphysis. FEA results of this study support previous findings that stresses associated with lateral transverse bending and dorsoventral shear of the mandibular symphysis can be minimized via an increased labio-lingual thickness in the superior transverse torus, an oblique symphyseal inclination, and/or an increased symphyseal depth. The finding that reduction of strains related to lateral transverse bending and dorsoventral shear can be achieved through a number of different morphologies contributes to our understanding of the influence of morphological and/or developmental constraints, such as dental development, on symphyseal form.
Keyword Finite element analysis
Mastication
Strain
Biomechanics
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 7 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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