Improving human health through understanding the complex structure of glucose polymers

Gilbert, Robert G., Wu, Alex C., Sullivan, Mitchell A., Sumarriva, Gonzalo E., Ersch, Natascha and Hasjim, Jovin (2013) Improving human health through understanding the complex structure of glucose polymers. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 405 28: 8969-8980. doi:10.1007/s00216-013-7129-1


Author Gilbert, Robert G.
Wu, Alex C.
Sullivan, Mitchell A.
Sumarriva, Gonzalo E.
Ersch, Natascha
Hasjim, Jovin
Title Improving human health through understanding the complex structure of glucose polymers
Journal name Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1618-2642
1618-2650
Publication date 2013-11-01
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1007/s00216-013-7129-1
Volume 405
Issue 28
Start page 8969
End page 8980
Total pages 12
Editor Albena Lederer
Peter J. Schoenmakers.
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Two highly branched glucose polymers with similar structures—starch and glycogen—have important relations to human health. Slowly digestible and resistant starches have desirable health benefits, including the prevention and alleviation of metabolic diseases and prevention of colon cancer. Glycogen is important in regulating the use of glucose in the body, and diabetic subjects have an anomaly in their glycogen structure compared with that in healthy subjects. This paper reviews the biosynthesis–structure–property relations of these polymers, showing that polymer characterization produces knowledge which can be useful in producing healthier foods and new drug targets aimed at improving glucose storage in diabetic patients. Examples include mathematical modeling to design starch with better nutritional values, the effects of amylose fine structures on starch digestibility, the structure of slowly digested starch collected from in vitro and in vivo digestion, and the mechanism of the formation of glycogen α particles from β particles in healthy subjects. A new method to overcome a current problem in the structural characterization of these polymers using field-flow fractionation is also given, through a technique to calibrate evaporative light scattering detection with starch.
Keyword Health
Separations/theory
Field-flow fractionation
Foods/beverages
Polymers
Separations/instrumentation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
Official 2014 Collection
Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 7 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 11 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 20 Nov 2013, 23:35:12 EST by Mrs Ann Dunn on behalf of Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences