An investigation into the clinical, personality, and neuropsychological correlates of Food Addiction in a sample of mostly normal weight women

Renee Fletcher (2013). An investigation into the clinical, personality, and neuropsychological correlates of Food Addiction in a sample of mostly normal weight women Professional Doctorate, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Renee Fletcher
Thesis Title An investigation into the clinical, personality, and neuropsychological correlates of Food Addiction in a sample of mostly normal weight women
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013-11-19
Thesis type Professional Doctorate
Supervisor Dr Natalie Loxton
Total pages 217
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
170109 Personality, Abilities and Assessment
Abstract/Summary The current study aimed to explore the prevalence and characteristics of Food Addiction (FA) in a cross-sectional sample of women. Two studies were conducted. Study 1 investigated whether FA in normal-weight women was characterised by the same clinical characteristics seen in overweight and obese women. 378 women who varied in weight and age were administered an online questionnaire which included measures utilised in previous studies investigating FA. These measures included the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) and measures of depression, dysfunctional eating, and reward sensitivity. The results found 4.5% of normal weight women met criteria for FA. As found in previous studies, women with FA reported significantly more stress, depression, dysfunctional eating behaviours, and reward sensitivity. Study 2 aimed to explore the personality and neuropsychological correlates of FA. Specifically, the study investigated whether women with FA performed significantly worse on decision-making tasks and whether an anticipatory stressor moderated this relationship. 102 women were randomly assigned to a control or stress condition. All participants completed the same online questionnaire utilised in study 1 as well as a series of neuropsychological tasks including the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), which is a measure of decision-making. Working memory and IQ were also assessed and controlled for. Before completing the IGT, the stress manipulation was given. IGT performance was analysed with the Expectancy-Valence learning model. There was limited support for the influence of FA on decision-making, with both women with and without FA performing similarly on the IGT overall. However, the introduction of an anticipatory stressor did lead to a rebalancing of attention to losses and gains in the FA group. The current study adds further support to the existence of FA by replicating previous findings on clinical characteristics in a normal weight sample as well as expanding understandings on the personality and cognitive traits which correlate with this type of eating pathology.
Keyword Food addiction
reward sensitivity
decision making

 
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Created: Tue, 19 Nov 2013, 17:01:33 EST by Renee Fletcher on behalf of Faculty of Social & Behavioural Sciences