The use of remote sensing to scale up measures of carbonate production on reef systems: a comparison of hydrochemical and census-based estimation methods

Hamylton, Sarah, Silverman, Jacob and Shaw, Emily (2013) The use of remote sensing to scale up measures of carbonate production on reef systems: a comparison of hydrochemical and census-based estimation methods. International Journal of Remote Sensing, 34 18: 6451-6465. doi:10.1080/01431161.2013.800654


Author Hamylton, Sarah
Silverman, Jacob
Shaw, Emily
Title The use of remote sensing to scale up measures of carbonate production on reef systems: a comparison of hydrochemical and census-based estimation methods
Journal name International Journal of Remote Sensing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0143-1161
1366-5901
Publication date 2013-09
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/01431161.2013.800654
Open Access Status
Volume 34
Issue 18
Start page 6451
End page 6465
Total pages 15
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The present study uses remote-sensing imagery to estimate carbonate production of the complete One Tree Island reef system, Great Barrier Reef, using hydrochemical (alkalinity reduction) and census-based (budgetary) methods. For five sites representing different benthic cover types across the reef system, carbonate production is determined using hydrochemical techniques that incubate substrates in a local aquarium and measure total alkalinity, total ammonia nitrogen, and total oxidized nitrogen. Local estimates are scaled up to the reef-system scale using a WorldView-2 satellite image, which is ground truthed against a field data set of 350 spatially referenced records of benthic assemblage. Annual total reef system carbonate production based on hydrochemical and census-based methods is estimated at 40,335 and 38,998 tonnes of calcium carbonate (CaCO3), respectively. The minimal difference (0.3%) between these estimates is attributed to under representation of small carbonate producers, such as benthic foraminifera, which are difficult to incorporate in the underwater video methodology employed to populate census budgets. This finding demonstrates the utility of remote sensing for upscaling local measures of carbonate production across reef systems accurately and consistently in spite of the use of different initial estimation methods.
Keyword Great Barrier Reef
Coral reefs
Calcium carbonate
Calcification
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
Non HERDC
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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