Errorless learning in children with brain injury: a comparison of standard and self-generation techniques

Haslam, Catherine, Bazen-Peters, Claire and Wright, Ingram (2012) Errorless learning in children with brain injury: a comparison of standard and self-generation techniques. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, 22 5: 697-715. doi:10.1080/09602011.2012.686820


Author Haslam, Catherine
Bazen-Peters, Claire
Wright, Ingram
Title Errorless learning in children with brain injury: a comparison of standard and self-generation techniques
Journal name Neuropsychological Rehabilitation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0960-2011
1464-0694
Publication date 2012-06-06
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/09602011.2012.686820
Volume 22
Issue 5
Start page 697
End page 715
Total pages 19
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Abstract The principle of errorless learning has proven efficacy in helping adults and older adults with acquired memory impairment learn novel information. However, surprisingly few studies have investigated its efficacy in children. The present study addresses this omission in the literature, investigating the effectiveness of two forms of errorless learning the established method, in which the examiner provides responses during learning, and a self-generation method, in which learners produce their own responses each relative to the standard baseline of trial-and-error learning, in young people with acquired brain injury (ABI, n=15) and non-injured controls (n=15). Participants learned different word lists in each condition and their memory was tested after distraction and, subsequently, after a 20-minute delay. Not surprisingly, controls performed better than the ABI group. However, while there was no effect of learning condition for controls, in the ABI group memory performance was significantly better under errorless conditions. In contrast to findings in the adult literature, there was no difference in the efficacy of the two errorless methods, suggesting that self-generation was no better than standard examiner-generation. This study extends upon previous research to provide the first demonstration of the effectiveness of errorless methods in a group of young people with ABI.
Keyword Brain injury
Errorless learning
Memory rehabilitation
Young people
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 15 Nov 2013, 19:53:42 EST by Catherine Haslam on behalf of School of Psychology