Particle size distribution effects that should be considered when performing flotation geometallurgical testing

Runge, K. C., Tabosa, E. and Jankovic, A. (2013). Particle size distribution effects that should be considered when performing flotation geometallurgical testing. In: Simon Dominy, Proceedings: The Second AusIMM International Geometallurgy Conference (GeoMet) 2013. GeoMet 2013: The Second AusIMM International Geometallurgy Conference, Brisbane, QLD, Australia, (335-344). 30 September-2 October, 2013.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Runge, K. C.
Tabosa, E.
Jankovic, A.
Title of paper Particle size distribution effects that should be considered when performing flotation geometallurgical testing
Conference name GeoMet 2013: The Second AusIMM International Geometallurgy Conference
Conference location Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Conference dates 30 September-2 October, 2013
Proceedings title Proceedings: The Second AusIMM International Geometallurgy Conference (GeoMet) 2013
Place of Publication Carlton, VIC, Australia
Publisher The Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy (AusIMM)
Publication Year 2013
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9781921522970
9781921522901
9781921522987
Editor Simon Dominy
Start page 335
End page 344
Total pages 10
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Flotation recovery in geometallurgical modelling is usually predicted based on relationships developed from batch flotation testing of different ore types. These batch flotation tests are usually performed at a constant set of operating conditions and at a fixed feed grind size P80. Usually the laboratory feed grind P80 is that which is expected to be produced in the full-scale flotation circuit for that particular ore type.

Flotation recovery will be a strong function of the valuable mineral particle size distribution, with lower recovery of ultra-fines due to poor flotation kinetics, optimum recovery for the intermediate sized particles and lower recovery for the coarser particles due to poorer liberation of this fraction. This valuable mineral particle size distribution is not characterised by the solids P80 parameter alone. The proportion of material in each class will also be a function of the slope of the size distribution and the degree of preferential grinding of the valuable mineral in comparison to the total mass of the ore.

This paper will demonstrate (through example) how these other size distribution parameters can change with a change in grinding technology, the size and operating conditions used in a grinding unit and the characteristics of the classification technology used in conjunction with the grinding unit. Case studies will be presented that demonstrate how this can result in these parameters being very different in laboratory testing to that produced in the full-scale comminution circuit. A rule of thumb that laboratory rod milling rather than ball milling produces a size distribution most similar to that of the full-scale grinding circuit will be challenged. These differences can result in a significant change in flotation recovery. It is therefore important to consider these parameters when developing a laboratory geometallurgical program, to enable more accurate prediction of the flotation recoveries that will be achieved in the full-scale process.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Thu, 14 Nov 2013, 15:13:55 EST by Jon Swabey on behalf of Julius Kruttschnitt Mineral Research Centre