Using isolation-by-distance-based approaches to assess the barrier effect of linear landscape elements on badger (Meles meles) dispersal

Frantz, A. C., Pope, L. C., Etherington, T. R., Wilson, G. J. and Burke, T. (2010) Using isolation-by-distance-based approaches to assess the barrier effect of linear landscape elements on badger (Meles meles) dispersal. Molecular Ecology, 19 8: 1663-1674. doi:10.1111/j.1365-294X.2010.04605.x


Author Frantz, A. C.
Pope, L. C.
Etherington, T. R.
Wilson, G. J.
Burke, T.
Title Using isolation-by-distance-based approaches to assess the barrier effect of linear landscape elements on badger (Meles meles) dispersal
Journal name Molecular Ecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0962-1083
1365-294X
Publication date 2010-04
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2010.04605.x
Open Access Status
Volume 19
Issue 8
Start page 1663
End page 1674
Total pages 12
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Formatted abstract
 As the European badger (Meles meles) can be of conservation or management concern, it is important to have a good understanding of the species’ dispersal ability. In particular, knowledge of landscape elements that affect dispersal can contribute to devising effective management strategies. However, the standard approach of using Bayesian clustering methods to correlate genetic discontinuities with landscape elements cannot easily be applied to this problem, as badger populations are often characterized by a strong confounding isolation-by-distance (IBD) pattern. We therefore developed a two-step method that compares the location of pairs of related badgers relative to a putative barrier and utilizes the expected spatial genetic structure characterized by IBD as a null model to test for the presence of a barrier. If a linear feature disrupts dispersal, the IBD pattern characterising pairs of individuals located on different sides of a putative barrier should differ significantly from the pattern obtained with pairs of individuals located on the same side. We used our new approach to assess the impact of rivers and roads of different sizes on badger dispersal in western England. We show that a large, wide river represented a barrier to badger dispersal and found evidence that a motorway may also restrict badger movement. Conversely, we did not find any evidence for small rivers and roads interfering with badger movement. One of the advantages of our approach is that potentially it can detect features that disrupt gene flow locally, without necessarily creating distinct identifiable genetic units.
Keyword Bayesian clustering
Bovine Tuberculosis
Dispersal
Landscape genetics
Wildlife management
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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