Maximizing the Environmental Benefits of Carbon Farming through Ecosystem Service Delivery

Lin, Brenda B., Macfadyen, Sarina, Renwick, Anna R., Cunningham, Saul A. and Schellhorn, Nancy A. (2013) Maximizing the Environmental Benefits of Carbon Farming through Ecosystem Service Delivery. Bioscience, 63 10: 793-803. doi:10.1525/bio.2013.63.10.6


Author Lin, Brenda B.
Macfadyen, Sarina
Renwick, Anna R.
Cunningham, Saul A.
Schellhorn, Nancy A.
Title Maximizing the Environmental Benefits of Carbon Farming through Ecosystem Service Delivery
Journal name Bioscience   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0006-3568
1525-3244)
Publication date 2013-10
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1525/bio.2013.63.10.6
Open Access Status
Volume 63
Issue 10
Start page 793
End page 803
Total pages 11
Place of publication Cary, United States
Publisher Oxford University Press
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
 The international carbon market provides a unique opportunity to increase ecosystem services and biodiversity through the revegetation of agricultural landscapes. Although the primary motivation for revegetation is to increase carbon sequestration, revegetated areas can provide additional financial, social, and environmental cobenefits that provide different levels of private and public net benefit. Conversely, carbon farming, if it is not implemented carefully, can create disbenefits, such as increased land clearing, monoculture plantations replacing diverse remnants, and unintended impacts across national borders. Economic models of carbon revegetation show that policies aimed at maximizing carbon sequestration alone will not necessarily lead to high uptake or maximize cobenefits. Careful consideration of policy incentives that encourage carbon plantings to deliver both public and private cobenefits is required, and solutions will need to balance both objectives in order to incentivize the sustainable, long-term management of carbon plantings across the landscape.
Keyword Biodiversity
Cobenefits
Disbenefits
Land use changes
Revegetation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 12 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 14 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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