Implementing computerised Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health checks in primary care for clinical care and research: a process evaluation

Spurling, Geoffrey K. P., Askew, Deborah A., Schluter, Philip J. and Hayman, Noel E. (2013) Implementing computerised Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health checks in primary care for clinical care and research: a process evaluation. Bmc Medical Informatics and Decision Making, 13 1: 108.1-108.7. doi:10.1186/1472-6947-13-108


Author Spurling, Geoffrey K. P.
Askew, Deborah A.
Schluter, Philip J.
Hayman, Noel E.
Title Implementing computerised Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health checks in primary care for clinical care and research: a process evaluation
Journal name Bmc Medical Informatics and Decision Making   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1472-6947
Publication date 2013-09
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/1472-6947-13-108
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 13
Issue 1
Start page 108.1
End page 108.7
Total pages 8
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central Ltd
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Paper-based Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health checks have promoted a preventive approach to primary care and provided data to support research at the Inala Indigenous Health Service, south-west Brisbane, Australia. Concerns about the limitations of paper-based health checks prompted us to change to a computerised system to realise potential benefits for clinical services and research capability. We describe the rationale, implementation and anticipated benefits of computerised Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health checks in one primary health care setting.

Methods.
In May 2010, the Inala Indigenous Health Service commenced a project to computerise Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child, adult, diabetic, and antenatal health checks. The computerised health checks were launched in September 2010 and then evaluated for staff satisfaction, research consent rate and uptake. Ethical approval for health check data to be used for research purposes was granted in December 2010.

Results: Three months after the September 2010 launch date, all but two health checks (378 out of 380, 99.5%) had been completed using the computerised system. Staff gave the system a median mark of 8 out of 10 (range 5-9), where 10 represented the highest level of overall satisfaction. By September 2011, 1099 child and adult health checks, 138 annual diabetic checks and 52 of the newly introduced antenatal checks had been completed. These numbers of computerised health checks are greater than for the previous year (2010) of paper-based health checks with a risk difference of 0.07 (95% confidence interval 0.05, 0.10). Additionally, two research projects based on computerised health check data were underway.

Conclusions:
The Inala Indigenous Health Service has demonstrated that moving from paper-based Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health checks to a system using computerised health checks is feasible and can facilitate research. We expect computerised health checks will improve clinical care and continue to enable research projects using validated data, reflecting the local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community's priorities.
Keyword Computerised medical record systems
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health
Primary health care
Indigenous Children
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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