Mate recognition in the South African citrus thrips Scirtothrips aurantii (Faure) and cross-mating tests with populations from Australia and South Africa

Rafter, M. A. and Walter, G. H. (2013) Mate recognition in the South African citrus thrips Scirtothrips aurantii (Faure) and cross-mating tests with populations from Australia and South Africa. Journal of Insect Behavior, 26 6: 780-795. doi:10.1007/s10905-013-9391-7


Author Rafter, M. A.
Walter, G. H.
Title Mate recognition in the South African citrus thrips Scirtothrips aurantii (Faure) and cross-mating tests with populations from Australia and South Africa
Formatted title
Mate recognition in the South African citrus thrips Scirtothrips aurantii (Faure) and cross-mating tests with populations from Australia and South Africa
Journal name Journal of Insect Behavior   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0892-7553
1572-8889
Publication date 2013-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10905-013-9391-7
Volume 26
Issue 6
Start page 780
End page 795
Total pages 16
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
South African citrus thrips (Scirtothrips aurantii) is a pest of citrus, mango and other horticultural species in its native range, which encompasses a large part of Africa. Its adventitious establishment in Australia in 2002 was a major cause for concern. The thrips, 11 years after its incursion into Australia, has remained on plants of a single host plant genus Bryophyllum (Crassulaceae). Characterization of the Specific-Mate Recognition System of the Bryophyllum population of thrips present in Australia and behavioral bioassay experiments revealed that compounds found in the insects' body extracts play a crucial role in mate recognition of S. aurantii. Reciprocal cross-mating experiments between the Australian Bryophyllum insects and South African S. aurantii from horticultural host plants showed that mating frequencies were significantly lower in test crosses (Bryophyllum x horticultural) than in controls (Bryophyllum x Bryophyllum or horticultural x horticultural), which indicates there are at least two distinct species within S. aurantii and suggests further tests of this interpretation. The results suggest that these tiny phytophagous insects localize mates through their association with a particular host plant species (or closely-related group of species). Also, specific tests are suggested for clarifying the species status of the host-associated populations of S. aurantii in Africa.
Keyword Thysanoptera
Generalist species
Polyphagy
Cryptic species
Mating ethogram
Behavioral bioassay
Reciprocal cross-mating experiments
Specific-mate recognition system
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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