A cohort study of equine laminitis in Great Britain 2009-2011: estimation of disease frequency and description of clinical signs in 577 cases

Wylie, C. E., Collins, S. N., Verheyen, K. L. P. and Newton, J. R. (2013) A cohort study of equine laminitis in Great Britain 2009-2011: estimation of disease frequency and description of clinical signs in 577 cases. Equine Veterinary Journal, 45 6: 681-687. doi:10.1111/evj.12047


Author Wylie, C. E.
Collins, S. N.
Verheyen, K. L. P.
Newton, J. R.
Title A cohort study of equine laminitis in Great Britain 2009-2011: estimation of disease frequency and description of clinical signs in 577 cases
Journal name Equine Veterinary Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0425-1644
2042-3306
Publication date 2013-11
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/evj.12047
Open Access Status
Volume 45
Issue 6
Start page 681
End page 687
Total pages 7
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Jossey Bass
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Reasons for performing study
A previous systematic review highlighted a lack of good evidence regarding the frequency of equine laminitis in Great Britain.

Objectives
To estimate the frequency of veterinary-diagnosed active laminitis in the general horse population of Great Britain and to describe the clinical signs present in cases.

Study design
Prospective cohort study.

Methods
Data on active episodes of equine laminitis were collected from veterinary practitioners.

Results
The prevalence of veterinary-diagnosed active laminitis was 0.47% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.42–0.52%) for the veterinary-attended population and 0.49% (95% CI 0.43–0.55%) for the veterinary-registered population, suggesting that active episodes of laminitis accounted for nearly one in 200 equine visits and occurred in nearly one in 200 horses registered with veterinary practices. The incidence of veterinary-diagnosed active laminitis was 0.5 cases per 100 horse-years at risk (95% CI 0.44–0.57). Laminitis occurred in all limbs, but most commonly affected the forelimbs bilaterally (53.5%, 95% CI 49.4–57.7%) and was most severe in the front feet. The most common clinical signs were increased digital pulses, difficulty turning and a short, stilted gait at walk.

Conclusions and potential relevance
The frequency of veterinary-diagnosed active laminitis was considerably lower than previously published estimates, which is probably due to differences in geographical setting, study period, case definition, study design and study populations.
Keyword Horse
Laminitis
Epidemiology
Frequency
Cohort
Clinical signs
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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