NARRATING THE PAST IN THE PRESENT: Gorenpul-Dandrabin understandings of the archaeological record on North Stradbroke Island and Peel Island, southeastern Queensland.

Clarke,Annie (2011). NARRATING THE PAST IN THE PRESENT: Gorenpul-Dandrabin understandings of the archaeological record on North Stradbroke Island and Peel Island, southeastern Queensland. Honours Thesis, School of Social Science, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Clarke,Annie
Thesis Title NARRATING THE PAST IN THE PRESENT: Gorenpul-Dandrabin understandings of the archaeological record on North Stradbroke Island and Peel Island, southeastern Queensland.
School, Centre or Institute School of Social Science
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2011
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Dr Annie Ross
Total pages 78
Language eng
Subjects 16 Studies in Human Society
Formatted abstract

We only come to know the past by virtue of its relationship to the present (Andrews and Buggey 2008; Bender 2006; Lucas 2005; Squair 1994:99-102). Thus interpretations of the past are inherently political. As postprocessual and postcolonial discourses have settled into the discipline it is now widely acknowledged that there is not one true past, but there are in fact many pasts, culturally and historically constituted. The multiplicity of pasts is described by Nabokov (2002) as a ‘forest of time’. It is these ‘alternative’ ways of understanding the archaeological record that are the focus of this thesis. I use a social constructivist and phenomenological methodology to explore the way Indigenous people generally, and Australian Aboriginal people in particular, understand the archaeological record that nests within their cultural landscape, using data from the archaeological research on North Stradbroke Island and Peel Island, Moreton Bay, southeastern Queensland, as my case study. I focus on Gorenpul-Dandrabin Traditional Owners’ understandings and uses of the archaeological data generated in these projects as a way of illustrating the social, cultural, and political context of archaeological research. I conclude that understandings of the past and the uses of information about the past are shaped by people‘s values, priorities, and experiences in the present, and also by hopes and imaginations for the future.


Document type: Thesis
Collection: UQ Theses (non-RHD) - UQ staff and students only
 
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Created: Thu, 07 Nov 2013, 12:45:01 EST by Yu-lin Huang on behalf of School of Social Science