Deeply divergent mitochondrial lineages reveal patterns of local endemism in chironomids of the Australian Wet Tropics

Krosch, Matt N., Baker, Andrew M., Mckie, Brendan G., Mather, Peter B. and Cranston, Peter S. (2009) Deeply divergent mitochondrial lineages reveal patterns of local endemism in chironomids of the Australian Wet Tropics. Austral Ecology, 34 3: 317-328. doi:10.1111/j.1442-9993.2009.01932.x


Author Krosch, Matt N.
Baker, Andrew M.
Mckie, Brendan G.
Mather, Peter B.
Cranston, Peter S.
Title Deeply divergent mitochondrial lineages reveal patterns of local endemism in chironomids of the Australian Wet Tropics
Journal name Austral Ecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1442-9985
1442-9993
Publication date 2009-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1442-9993.2009.01932.x
Volume 34
Issue 3
Start page 317
End page 328
Total pages 12
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The Wet Tropics bioregion of north-eastern Australia has been subject to extensive fluctuations in climate throughout the late Pliocene and Pleistocene. Cycles of rainforest contraction and expansion of dry sclerophyll forest associated with such climatic fluctuations are postulated to have played a major role in driving geographical endemism in terrestrial rainforest taxa. Consequences for the distributions of aquatic organisms, however, are poorly understood. The Australian non-biting midge species Echinocladius martini Cranston (Diptera: Chironomidae), although restricted to cool, well-forested freshwater streams, has been considered to be able to disperse among populations located in isolated rainforest pockets during periods of sclerophyllous forest expansion, potentially limiting the effect of climatic fluctuations on patterns of endemism. In this study, mitochondrial COI and 16S data were analysed for E. martini collected from eight sites spanning the Wet Tropics bioregion to assess the scale and extent of phylogeographic structure. Analyses of genetic structure showed several highly divergent cryptic lineages with restricted geographical distributions. Within one of the identified lineages, strong genetic structure implied that dispersal among proximate (<1 km apart) streams was extremely restricted. The results suggest that vicariant processes, most likely due to the systemic drying of the Australian continent during the Plio-Pleistocene, might have fragmented historical E. martini populations and, hence, promoted divergence in allopatry.
Keyword Chironomidae
Cryptic diversity
Echinocladius martini
Pleistocene
Vicariance
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Centre for Water in the Minerals Industry
 
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Created: Fri, 25 Oct 2013, 15:37:25 EST by Matthew Krosch on behalf of Centre for Water in the Minerals Industry