Designing colon-specific delivery systems for anticancer drug-loaded nanoparticles: an evaluation of alginate carriers

Ma, Yiming and Coombes, Allan G. A. (2013) Designing colon-specific delivery systems for anticancer drug-loaded nanoparticles: an evaluation of alginate carriers. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research: Part A, Early View 1-10. doi:10.1002/jbm.a.34988

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Author Ma, Yiming
Coombes, Allan G. A.
Title Designing colon-specific delivery systems for anticancer drug-loaded nanoparticles: an evaluation of alginate carriers
Journal name Journal of Biomedical Materials Research: Part A   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1549-3296
1552-4965
Publication date 2013-10-18
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/jbm.a.34988
Volume Early View
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Incorporation of drug-loaded nanoparticles (NPs) in colon-specific delivery systems shows potential for raising local drug concentrations, tumor targeting and improving chemotherapy. Alginate microcapsules (15–80 µm diameter) containing insoluble Eudragit® RS NPs as models were characterized precisely in terms of NP loading and release kinetics. High NP loading (22%, w/w of the dried microcapsules) combined with negligible release in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) and simulated intestinal fluid (SIF) suggested that high concentrations of NPs could be transported to the colon. However, NP aggregation was confirmed at extremely low concentration (0.0003%, w/v) in alginate solution (0.007%, w/v) and after release from alginate microcapsules. Indomethacin, a model anticolorectal cancer drug, was encapsulated in pH-responsive Eudragit® S100 NPs (116 nm, 5%, w/w drug loading) using the nanoprecipitation method. Approximately 90% of the drug load was released from the NPs in SGF and SIF before transfer to simulated colon fluid (SCF). However, incorporation of NPs in 2 mm alginate pellets resulted in a significantly higher fraction of the drug load (around 60%) being available for release in SCF. Delivery of isolated NPs to the colon for interaction with and uptake by cancer cells requires elimination of NP-excipient interactions that promote NP aggregation. NP-loaded alginate carriers, meanwhile, offer a promising strategy for delivery of anticancer drugs to tumor sites in the colon and reducing systemic side effects.
Keyword Eudragit nanoparticles
Colorectal cancer
Alginate microcapsules
Aggregation
Transmission electron microscopy
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 18 OCT 2013

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Pharmacy Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 24 Oct 2013, 16:16:40 EST by Yiming Ma on behalf of School of Pharmacy