Why do some cancer patients receiving chemotherapy choose to take complementary and alternative medicines and what are the risks?

Smith, Peter J., Clavarino, Alexandra M., Long, Jeremy and Steadman, Kathryn (2014) Why do some cancer patients receiving chemotherapy choose to take complementary and alternative medicines and what are the risks?. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, 10 1: 1-10. doi:10.1111/ajco.12115

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Author Smith, Peter J.
Clavarino, Alexandra M.
Long, Jeremy
Steadman, Kathryn
Title Why do some cancer patients receiving chemotherapy choose to take complementary and alternative medicines and what are the risks?
Journal name Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1743-7555
1743-7563
Publication date 2014-03
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/ajco.12115
Open Access Status
Volume 10
Issue 1
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) cover a broad and diverse group of treatments and products that do not tend to be widely used by conventional healthcare professions. CAM that is systemically absorbed is the most likely to interfere with concurrent chemotherapy and potentially cause harm to cancer patients. Patients receiving chemotherapy may be consuming CAM to treat cancer, to lessen chemotherapy side effects, for symptom management, or to treat conditions unrelated to their cancer. A small proportion of cancer patients decide to use CAM alone to treat cancer and delay conventional treatment. Cancer patients may be influenced in their CAM decision-making by others: practitioners, family, friends, spouse and even casual acquaintances met in waiting rooms and support groups. This influence may range from encouraging and supporting the patient's decision through to making the decisions for the patient. When tested in rigorous clinical trials, no CAM cancer treatments alone have shown benefit beyond placebo. With the exception of ginger to treat chemotherapy-induced nausea, there is no compelling evidence overriding risk to take complementary medicines for supportive care during chemotherapy treatment. There is, however, established evidence to use mind–body complementary therapies for supportive care during chemotherapy treatment.
Keyword Chemotherapy
Complementary and alternative medicine
Decision-making
Group 3: other specific research areas
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 5 August 2013.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Pharmacy Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 21 Oct 2013, 14:32:13 EST by Myrtle Sahabandu on behalf of School of Pharmacy