The Importance of Cardiorespiratory Fitness in the United States: The Need for a National Registry A Policy Statement From the American Heart Association

Kaminsky, Leonard A., Arena, Ross, Beckie, Theresa M., Brubaker, Peter H., Church, Timothy S., Forman, Daniel E., Franklin, Barry A., Gulati, Martha, Lavie, Carl J., Myers, Jonathan, Patel, Mahesh J., Pina, Ileana L., Weintraub, William S. and Williams, Mark A. (2013) The Importance of Cardiorespiratory Fitness in the United States: The Need for a National Registry A Policy Statement From the American Heart Association. Circulation, 127 5: 652-662. doi:10.1161/CIR.0b013e31827ee100

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Kaminsky, Leonard A.
Arena, Ross
Beckie, Theresa M.
Brubaker, Peter H.
Church, Timothy S.
Forman, Daniel E.
Franklin, Barry A.
Gulati, Martha
Lavie, Carl J.
Myers, Jonathan
Patel, Mahesh J.
Pina, Ileana L.
Weintraub, William S.
Williams, Mark A.
Title The Importance of Cardiorespiratory Fitness in the United States: The Need for a National Registry A Policy Statement From the American Heart Association
Journal name Circulation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0009-7322
1524-4539
Publication date 2013-02
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1161/CIR.0b013e31827ee100
Open Access Status
Volume 127
Issue 5
Start page 652
End page 662
Total pages 11
Place of publication Baltimore, United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The recent 2012 update of the Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics from the American Heart Association (AHA) emphasizes the continuing burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the United States, with a prevalence of CVD nearing 40% in those approaching 60 years of age and exceeding 70% in older ages.1 Direct and indirect costs of CVD in the United States exceeded $300 billion in 2008, and the projected total costs of CVD in 2015 and 2030 are more than $500 billion and nearly $1200 billion, respectively.2 Recently, the AHA developed year 2020 impact goals to achieve ideal cardiovascular health, which is influenced greatly by key health behaviors of being physically active, maintaining appropriate dietary habits, and not smoking.3 The obesity epidemic in the United States has been a substantial contributor to the CVD burden, with current estimates of obesity prevalence being ≈20% in US children and adolescents and >33% in adults 20 to 74 years of age. It is well accepted that for most people, obesity is a direct outcome of an energy-rich diet, lack of sufficient physical activity (PA), or both. Another consequence of both obesity and insufficient PA is a reduction in cardiorespiratory (or aerobic) fitness (CRF) levels. Collectively, this evidence emphasizes that an individual’s health behaviors have a major role in the prevention of CVD, which is of critical importance in the United States and worldwide from a medical and economic perspective.
Keyword All-Cause Mortality
Cardiovascular-Disease Mortality
Body-Mass Index
Exercise Capacity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 72 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 79 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Fri, 18 Oct 2013, 18:57:00 EST by System User on behalf of School of Medicine