Reliability of a laboratory-based protocol to assess running performance during an Olympic distance triathlon

Cavallaro, Vanessa (2013). Reliability of a laboratory-based protocol to assess running performance during an Olympic distance triathlon MPhil Thesis, School of Human Movement Studies, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Cavallaro, Vanessa
Thesis Title Reliability of a laboratory-based protocol to assess running performance during an Olympic distance triathlon
Formatted title
Reliability of a Laboratory-based Protocol to Assess Running Performance during an Olympic Distance Triathlon
School, Centre or Institute School of Human Movement Studies
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2013
Thesis type MPhil Thesis
Supervisor David Jenkins
Tina Skinner
Greg Cox
Lynne Emmerton
Total pages 99
Total colour pages 91
Total black and white pages 8
Language eng
Subjects 110602 Exercise Physiology
110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
111101 Clinical and Sports Nutrition
Abstract/Summary PURPOSE: Partial and complete simulations under controlled laboratory conditions have been used to assess Olympic distance triathlon (ODT) performance; however, no studies have reported on the reliability of these performance measures. The aim of the study presented in this thesis was to determine the reliability of a laboratory-based protocol to assess running performance during an ODT. METHODS: Eleven well-trained, competitive male triathletes (age = 35 ± 5 y, height = 182.7 ± 3.3 cm, baseline body mass = 79.4 ± 7.9 kg, peak aerobic capacity (running) = 60.0 ± 5.0 mL.kg-1.min-1 and peak aerobic capacity (cycling) = 58.6 ± 4.7 mL.kg-1.min-1) completed the following test procedures: 1) running and cycling incremental tests performed in a randomised order and separated by ≥ 48 h; and 2) four consecutive ‘pre-loaded’ ODT time trials (ODT TTpre) separated by ≥ 7 d. For all ODT TTpre, the 1.5 km swim (50 m pool) and 60 min (~ 40 km) cycle (electro-magnetically braked cycle ergometer) were completed at a fixed pre-determined intensity (85-90% 400 m time trial pace and 60% maximal aerobic power, respectively), functioning as a pre-load to the 10 km run time trial (motorised treadmill). In addition to performance times, physiological (heart rate, concentrations of blood glucose and lactate) and perceptual (ratings of perceived exertion and gastro-intestinal discomfort) measures were recorded. A one-way repeated measures analysis of variance was used to compare differences in measured variables between trials. Reliability of performance and physiological variables were determined by calculating the coefficient of variation (CV) and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) for consecutive pairs of trials. RESULTS: No statistically significant differences were found for any performance measures across trials (p ≥ 0.20). Run times and total performance times (combined times for swim, cycle and run) were highly reproducible (CV ≤ 2.6%, ICC ≥ 0.97 and CV ≤ 1.0%, ICC ≥ 0.96, respectively) and no learning effects were observed across the four ODT TTpre despite the absence of formal familiarisation. Compared to the performance measures, increased variability was observed among physiological variables, with CV as high as 34.9% (blood lactate) and ICC as low as 0.35 (blood glucose). Mean ratings of perceived exertion were not significantly different across trials for each discipline (p > 0.10), while significant differences in mean gastro-intestinal discomfort were found for the swim only (p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: The ODT TTpre protocol offers a reliable measure of triathlon running performance among well-trained, competitive male triathletes. Variability in repeated performance times were similar to those of international ODT competitions, however, direct comparisons to laboratory simulated ODT are limited at present. Validation of the protocol and associated physiological responses is recommended as a direction for future research to facilitate the investigation of nutritional, pharmacological or training interventions specific to the sport of triathlon, and assist with training prescription, performance prediction and analysis.
Formatted abstract
PURPOSE: Partial and complete simulations under controlled laboratory conditions have been used to assess Olympic distance triathlon (ODT) performance; however, no studies have reported on the reliability of these performance measures. The aim of the study presented in this thesis was to determine the reliability of a laboratory-based protocol to assess running performance during an ODT. METHODS: Eleven well-trained, competitive male triathletes (age = 35 ± 5 y, height = 182.7 ± 3.3 cm, baseline body mass = 79.4 ± 7.9 kg, peak aerobic capacity (running) = 60.0 ± 5.0 mL.kg-1.min-1 and peak aerobic capacity (cycling) = 58.6 ± 4.7 mL.kg-1.min-1) completed the following test procedures: 1) running and cycling incremental tests performed in a randomised order and separated by ≥ 48 h; and 2) four consecutive ‘pre-loaded’ ODT time trials (ODT TTpre) separated by ≥ 7 d. For all ODT TTpre, the 1.5 km swim (50 m pool) and 60 min (~ 40 km) cycle (electro-magnetically braked cycle ergometer) were completed at a fixed pre-determined intensity (85-90% 400 m time trial pace and 60% maximal aerobic power, respectively), functioning as a pre-load to the 10 km run time trial (motorised treadmill). In addition to performance times, physiological (heart rate, concentrations of blood glucose and lactate) and perceptual (ratings of perceived exertion and gastro-intestinal discomfort) measures were recorded. A one-way repeated measures analysis of variance was used to compare differences in measured variables between trials. Reliability of performance and physiological variables were determined by calculating the coefficient of variation (CV) and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) for consecutive pairs of trials. RESULTS: No statistically significant differences were found for any performance measures across trials (p ≥ 0.20). Run times and total performance times (combined times for swim, cycle and run) were highly reproducible (CV ≤ 2.6%, ICC ≥ 0.97 and CV ≤ 1.0%, ICC ≥ 0.96, respectively) and no learning effects were observed across the four ODT TTpre despite the absence of formal familiarisation. Compared to the performance measures, increased variability was observed among physiological variables, with CV as high as 34.9% (blood lactate) and ICC as low as 0.35 (blood glucose). Mean ratings of perceived exertion were not significantly different across trials for each discipline (p > 0.10), while significant differences in mean gastro-intestinal discomfort were found for the swim only (p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: The ODT TTpre protocol offers a reliable measure of triathlon running performance among well-trained, competitive male triathletes. Variability in repeated performance times were similar to those of international ODT competitions, however, direct comparisons to laboratory simulated ODT are limited at present. Validation of the protocol and associated physiological responses is recommended as a direction for future research to facilitate the investigation of nutritional, pharmacological or training interventions specific to the sport of triathlon, and assist with training prescription, performance prediction and analysis.
Keyword reliability
reproducibility
triathlon
multi-sport
running
sports performance
time trial

 
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Created: Wed, 16 Oct 2013, 00:15:25 EST by Vanessa Cavallaro on behalf of Scholarly Communication and Digitisation Service