Youth culture, physical education and the question of relevance: after 20 years, a reply to Tinning and Fitzclarence

Gard, Michael, Hickey-Moodey, Anna and Enright, Eimear (2013) Youth culture, physical education and the question of relevance: after 20 years, a reply to Tinning and Fitzclarence. Sport Education and Society, 18 1: 97-114. doi:10.1080/13573322.2012.690341


Author Gard, Michael
Hickey-Moodey, Anna
Enright, Eimear
Title Youth culture, physical education and the question of relevance: after 20 years, a reply to Tinning and Fitzclarence
Journal name Sport Education and Society   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1357-3322
1470-1243
Publication date 2013-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/13573322.2012.690341
Volume 18
Issue 1
Start page 97
End page 114
Total pages 18
Place of publication Oxon, Uniited Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Abstract This article is an attempt to think through the idea that physical education should draw from youth culture in order to be more ‘relevant’ to students. We begin by revisiting Tinning and Fitzclarence's 1992 article ‘Postmodern youth culture and the crisis in Australian secondary school physical education’ in which they essentially argued that young people were bored by physical education because it had failed to keep pace with the pleasures they derive from consumer culture. With this as a starting point, we try to both critique and extend Tinning and Fizclarence's ideas by drawing on two broad areas of scholarship; cultural studies of youth and participatory action research. Our purpose here is twofold. First, we want to help clarify what might be meant by the terms ‘youth culture’ and ‘relevance’. Flowing on from this, we suggest some directions for practice and research. These suggestions are not ‘solutions’ and we are at pains to argue that the ‘relevance problem’ may in fact be an unwitting shorthand for a range of related but distinct challenges. Because of this, as well as our own differing perspectives, we propose contradictory paths forward, including both more and less interest in student subjectivity and more and less allowance for student autonomy.
Keyword Physical education
Youth culture
Cultural studies
Student voice
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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