Effects of Habitual Coffee Consumption on Cardiometabolic Disease, Cardiovascular Health, and All-Cause Mortality

O'Keefe, James H., Bhatti, Salman K., Patil, Harshal R., DiNicolantonio, James J., Lucan, Sean C. and Lavie, Carl J. (2013) Effects of Habitual Coffee Consumption on Cardiometabolic Disease, Cardiovascular Health, and All-Cause Mortality. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 62 12: 1043-1051. doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2013.06.035


Author O'Keefe, James H.
Bhatti, Salman K.
Patil, Harshal R.
DiNicolantonio, James J.
Lucan, Sean C.
Lavie, Carl J.
Title Effects of Habitual Coffee Consumption on Cardiometabolic Disease, Cardiovascular Health, and All-Cause Mortality
Journal name Journal of the American College of Cardiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0735-1097
1558-3597
Publication date 2013-09
Year available 2013
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/j.jacc.2013.06.035
Volume 62
Issue 12
Start page 1043
End page 1051
Total pages 9
Place of publication San Diego, United States
Publisher Elsevier Inc
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Coffee, after water, is the most widely consumed beverage in the United States, and is the principal source of caffeine intake among adults. The biological effects of coffee may be substantial and are not limited to the actions of caffeine. Coffee is a complex beverage containing hundreds of biologically active compounds, and the health effects of chronic coffee intake are wide ranging. From a cardiovascular (CV) standpoint, coffee consumption may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension, as well as other conditions associated with CV risk such as obesity and depression; but it may adversely affect lipid profiles depending on how the beverage is prepared. Regardless, a growing body of data suggests that habitual coffee consumption is neutral to beneficial regarding the risks of a variety of adverse CV outcomes including coronary heart disease, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, and stroke. Moreover, large epidemiological studies suggest that regular coffee drinkers have reduced risks of mortality, both CV and all-cause. The potential benefits also include protection against neurodegenerative diseases, improved asthma control, and lower risk of select gastrointestinal diseases. A daily intake of ∼2 to 3 cups of coffee appears to be safe and is associated with neutral to beneficial effects for most of the studied health outcomes. However, most of the data on coffee’s health effects are based on observational data, with very few randomized, controlled studies, and association does not prove causation. Additionally, the possible advantages of regular coffee consumption have to be weighed against potential risks (which are mostly related to its high caffeine content) including anxiety, insomnia, tremulousness, and palpitations, as well as bone loss and possibly increased risk of fractures.
Keyword Caffeine
Cardiometabolic disease
Coffee
Coronary heart disease
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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