Tracing the Tiger: Population Genetics Provides Valuable Insights into the Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus Invasion of the Australasian Region

Beebe, Nigel W., Ambrose, Luke, Hill, Lydia A., Davis, Joseph B., Hapgood, George, Cooper, Robert D., Russell, Richard C., Ritchie, Scott A., Reimer, Lisa J., Lobo, Neil F., Syafruddin, Din and van den Hurk, Andrew F. (2013) Tracing the Tiger: Population Genetics Provides Valuable Insights into the Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus Invasion of the Australasian Region. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 7 8: e2361.1-e2361.11. doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0002361


Author Beebe, Nigel W.
Ambrose, Luke
Hill, Lydia A.
Davis, Joseph B.
Hapgood, George
Cooper, Robert D.
Russell, Richard C.
Ritchie, Scott A.
Reimer, Lisa J.
Lobo, Neil F.
Syafruddin, Din
van den Hurk, Andrew F.
Title Tracing the Tiger: Population Genetics Provides Valuable Insights into the Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus Invasion of the Australasian Region
Journal name PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1935-2727
1935-2735
Publication date 2013-08
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pntd.0002361
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 7
Issue 8
Start page e2361.1
End page e2361.11
Total pages 12
Place of publication San Francisco, CA United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background:The range of the Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus is expanding globally, raising the threat of emerging and re-emerging arbovirus transmission risks including dengue and chikungunya. Its detection in Papua New Guinea's (PNG) southern Fly River coastal region in 1988 and 1992 placed it 150 km from mainland Australia. However, it was not until 12 years later that it appeared on the Torres Strait Islands. We hypothesized that the extant PNG population expanded into the Torres Straits as an indirect effect of drought-proofing the southern Fly River coastal villages in response to El Nino-driven climate variability in the region (via the rollout of rainwater tanks and water storage containers).

Methodology/Principal Findings:Examination of the mosquito's mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase I (COI) sequences and 13 novel nuclear microsatellites revealed evidence of substantial intermixing between PNG's southern Fly region and Torres Strait Island populations essentially compromising any island eradication attempts due to potential of reintroduction. However, two genetically distinct populations were identified in this region comprising the historically extant PNG populations and the exotic introduced population. Both COI sequence data and microsatellites showed the introduced population to have genetic affinities to populations from Timor Leste and Jakarta in the Indonesian region.

Conclusions/Significance:
The Ae. albopictus invasion into the Australian region was not a range expansion out of PNG as suspected, but founded by other, genetically distinct population(s), with strong genetic affinities to populations sampled from the Indonesian region. We now suspect that the introduction of Ae. albopictus into the Australian region was driven by widespread illegal fishing activity originating from the Indonesian region during this period. Human sea traffic is apparently shuttling this mosquito between islands in the Torres Strait and the southern PNG mainland and this extensive movement may well compromise Ae. albopictus eradication attempts in this region.
Keyword Chikungunya Virus
Torres Strait
Skuse Diptera
Culicidae
Mosquitos
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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