Cell compartmentalization and endocytosis in planctomycetes: structure and function in complex bacteria

Fuerst, John A., Webb, Richard I. and Sagulenko, Evgeny (2013). Cell compartmentalization and endocytosis in planctomycetes: structure and function in complex bacteria. In John A. Fuerst (Ed.), Planctomycetes: Cell Structure, Origins and Biology (pp. 39-75) New York, NY, United States: Springer New York. doi:10.1007/978-1-62703-502-6


Author Fuerst, John A.
Webb, Richard I.
Sagulenko, Evgeny
Title of chapter Cell compartmentalization and endocytosis in planctomycetes: structure and function in complex bacteria
Title of book Planctomycetes: Cell Structure, Origins and Biology
Place of Publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Springer New York
Publication Year 2013
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
DOI 10.1007/978-1-62703-502-6
Open Access Status
ISBN 9781627035019
9781627035026
Editor John A. Fuerst
Chapter number 2
Start page 39
End page 75
Total pages 37
Total chapters 12
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Planctomycetes are unique among the domain Bacteria in possessing cells with a complex plan defined by internal membranes forming separated compartments within the cell. They also possess other unique features such as cell walls composed of protein as a major polymer instead of the peptidoglycan typical of other bacteria. All species examined display an underlying shared cell organization in which an internal intracytoplasmic membrane separates two major cell compartments, an outer ribosome-free paryphoplasm and a more central ribosome-containing pirellulosome. Some planctomycete species have three compartments, where further membranes within the pirellulosome define another compartment, the anammoxosome in anammox planctomycetes and the membrane-bounded nuclear body in Gemmata obscuriglobus. Compartments are preserved when new cells are formed during division. Functional features which are correlated with structural compartmentalization in planctomycetes include in G. obscuriglobus the ability to take up proteins within the paryphoplasm of the cell by a mechanism similar to receptor-mediated endocytosis of eukaryotes. Novel molecular and cell biology features for bacteria can be predicted to accompany such structural and functional complexity and are discussed here.
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 25 Sep 2013, 15:30:33 EST by Professor John Fuerst on behalf of School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences