An Exceptionally Well-Preserved Short-Snouted Bandicoot (Marsupialia; Peramelemorphia) From Riversleigh'S Oligo-Miocene Deposits, Northwestern Queensland, Australia

Travouillon, K. J., Gurovich, Y., Beck, R. M. D. and Muirhead, J. (2010) An Exceptionally Well-Preserved Short-Snouted Bandicoot (Marsupialia; Peramelemorphia) From Riversleigh'S Oligo-Miocene Deposits, Northwestern Queensland, Australia. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 30 5: 1528-1546. doi:10.1080/02724634.2010.501463


Author Travouillon, K. J.
Gurovich, Y.
Beck, R. M. D.
Muirhead, J.
Title An Exceptionally Well-Preserved Short-Snouted Bandicoot (Marsupialia; Peramelemorphia) From Riversleigh'S Oligo-Miocene Deposits, Northwestern Queensland, Australia
Journal name Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0272-4634
1937-2809
Publication date 2010-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/02724634.2010.501463
Open Access Status
Volume 30
Issue 5
Start page 1528
End page 1546
Total pages 19
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA United States
Publisher Taylor and Francis Inc
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Formatted abstract
We describe Galadi speciosus, gen. et sp nov., the second peramelemorphian (Yarala burchfieldi being the first) to be described from Oligo-Miocene deposits of Riversleigh World Heritage Property, northwestern Queensland. G. speciosus is represented by relatively complete craniodental material, including an exceptionally well-preserved skull. This taxon exhibits several apomorphies that clearly place it in the order Peramelemorphia, but it appears to be more plesiomorphic than any modern bandicoot. We present the first morphological phylogenetic analyses of Peramelemorphia, using 51 craniodental characters. Our analyses recover Yarala and Galadi speciosus outside crown group Peramelemorphia, with G. speciosus weakly supported as the sister taxon of the crown group. The craniodental morphology of G. speciosus, particularly its robust skull and proportionately short and broad snout, suggests that it filled a different ecological niche to extant bandicoots. We hypothesize that G. speciosus occupied a predominantly faunivorous, dasyurid-like niche in the Oligo-Miocene rainforests of Riversleigh, at a time when dasyurids appear to have been relatively rare. 
Keyword Phylogenetic relationships
Yarala Burchfieldi
Early Pliocene
Sequences
Miocene
Mammals
Affinities
Skull
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Earth Sciences Publications
 
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