Management of over-the-counter insomnia complaints in Australian community pharmacies: A standardized patient study

Kashyap, Krishneeta C., Nissen, Lisa M., Smith, Simon S. and Kyle, Greg (2013) Management of over-the-counter insomnia complaints in Australian community pharmacies: A standardized patient study. International Journal of Pharmacy Practice, 22 2: 125-134. doi:10.1111/ijpp.12052


Author Kashyap, Krishneeta C.
Nissen, Lisa M.
Smith, Simon S.
Kyle, Greg
Title Management of over-the-counter insomnia complaints in Australian community pharmacies: A standardized patient study
Journal name International Journal of Pharmacy Practice   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0961-7671
2042-7174
Publication date 2013-08-15
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/ijpp.12052
Volume 22
Issue 2
Start page 125
End page 134
Total pages 10
Place of publication West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective To evaluate the current management of over-the-counter (OTC) insomnia complaints in Australian community pharmacies using standardized patientmethodology.
Methods Trained standardized patients visited a sample of 100 randomly selected South East Queensland community pharmacies in June 2011. The standardized patients enacted two OTC insomnia scenarios: a direct product request (DPR)
(n = 50) and a symptom-based request (SBR) (n = 50). Results of the interactions were documented immediately after each visit and evaluated using the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia’sWHAT STOP GO protocol as a standard comparison.
Key findings Of all DPRs, 30% were handled entirely by the pharmacist, 70% of staff enquired about specific symptoms and 28% investigated the cause of insomnia. No staff investigated the frequency of product use. The DPR scenario resulted in a92% supply of the requested doxylamine product (Restavit). In the SBR scenario, 18% of requests were handled entirely by the pharmacist, 58% of staff enquired about specific symptoms and 44% investigated the cause of insomnia. Staff recommended medicated products (38%), or herbal (78%) or non-drug techniques (18%). Investigation into smoking and alcohol intake was not undertaken in DPR or SBR interactions, while questioning on caffeine intake was undertaken in 2 and 14% of cases respectively. There were no significant differences found in the handling of sleep requests by pharmacists compared to pharmacy assistants.
Conclusion The standardized patient methodology was a successful way to assess the community pharmacy counselling provided with OTC sleep requests and suboptimal staff responses were found when compared with recommended practice
standards.
Keyword Clinical Pharmacy
Clinical practice
Community Pharmacy
Non-prescription medicines
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes In Press: Article first published online: 15 AUG 2013

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Pharmacy Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 19 Sep 2013, 10:34:39 EST by Christopher O'Keefe on behalf of School of Pharmacy