Telling their whiteness to a non-white researcher: New Zealand European and other white categories

Yamaguchi, Masataka (2012). Telling their whiteness to a non-white researcher: New Zealand European and other white categories. In: Chris Conlan, Refereed Proceedings: Applied Linguistics Association of Australia Annual Conference 2012. Applied Linguistics Association of Australia Annual Conference (ALAA) 2012, Perth, Australia, (590-609). 12-14 November 2012.

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Author Yamaguchi, Masataka
Title of paper Telling their whiteness to a non-white researcher: New Zealand European and other white categories
Conference name Applied Linguistics Association of Australia Annual Conference (ALAA) 2012
Conference location Perth, Australia
Conference dates 12-14 November 2012
Proceedings title Refereed Proceedings: Applied Linguistics Association of Australia Annual Conference 2012
Place of Publication Perth, Australia
Publisher Curtin University, School of Education
Publication Year 2012
Year available 2012
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISBN 9780987415820
Editor Chris Conlan
Start page 590
End page 609
Total pages 19
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Adopting Bucholtz’ (2011) techniques for eliciting ethnoracial self-categories, I am concerned with the (re)production of whiteness in and by discourse by examining interview data taken from five white New Zealanders. The interviews were conducted by this author in New Zealand. The interviewees were recruited from the Japanese language program at a university. Specifically, I asked the interviewees ‘age, school year, sex and ethnicity’ by framing the question ‘for the record.’ Through analysis, I argue that categories of whiteness are both locally emergent and simultaneously reproduced from widely circulating discourses; that ethnicity-based labels induce colour-blind race talk. As empirical findings, an unmarked pattern was the label of ‘New Zealand European,’ used by three interviewees, which is exactly the same as the one in Census; one interviewee uttered its variant ‘European New Zealander.’ On the other hand, the fifth interviewee gave an elaborate answer with nationality- and ethnicity-based categories ‘Dutch, American, and Kiwi’ by invoking the cultural diversity among the apparently homogeneous category ‘white.’ In discussing implications, I suggest that whiteness should not necessarily mean ‘culturelessness’ in a colour-blind frame of race talk.
Keyword Language and culture
Whiteness
Discourse analysis
Research interview
Methods
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
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Created: Mon, 16 Sep 2013, 15:31:05 EST by Masataka Yamaguchi on behalf of School of Languages and Cultures