Reconciling forest conservation and logging in Indonesian Borneo

Gaveau, David L. A., Kshatriya, Mrigesh, Sheil, Douglas, Sloan, Sean, Molidena, Elis, Wijaya, Arief, Wich, Serge, Ancrenaz, Marc, Hansen, Matthew, Broich, Mark, Guariguata, Manuel R., Pacheco, Pablo, Potapov, Peter, Turubanova, Svetlana and Meijaard, Erik (2013) Reconciling forest conservation and logging in Indonesian Borneo. PLoS One, 8 8: e69887.1-e69887.11. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0069887

Author Gaveau, David L. A.
Kshatriya, Mrigesh
Sheil, Douglas
Sloan, Sean
Molidena, Elis
Wijaya, Arief
Wich, Serge
Ancrenaz, Marc
Hansen, Matthew
Broich, Mark
Guariguata, Manuel R.
Pacheco, Pablo
Potapov, Peter
Turubanova, Svetlana
Meijaard, Erik
Title Reconciling forest conservation and logging in Indonesian Borneo
Journal name PLoS One   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2013-08
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0069887
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 8
Issue 8
Start page e69887.1
End page e69887.11
Total pages 11
Place of publication San Francisco, CA, United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Abstract Combining protected areas with natural forest timber concessions may sustain larger forest landscapes than is possible via protected areas alone. However, the role of timber concessions in maintaining natural forest remains poorly characterized.An estimated 57% (303,525 km2) of Kalimantan's land area (532,100 km2) was covered by natural forest in 2000. About 14,212 km2 (4.7%) had been cleared by 2010. Forests in oil palm concessions had been reduced by 5,600 km2 (14.1%), while the figures for timber concessions are 1,336 km2 (1.5%), and for protected forests are 1,122 km2 (1.2%). These deforestation rates explain little about the relative performance of the different land use categories under equivalent conversion risks due to the confounding effects of location.An estimated 25% of lands allocated for timber harvesting in 2000 had their status changed to industrial plantation concessions in 2010. Based on a sample of 3,391 forest plots (1×1 km; 100 ha), and matching statistical analyses, 2000-2010 deforestation was on average 17.6 ha lower (95% C.I.: -22.3 ha--12.9 ha) in timber concession plots than in oil palm concession plots. When location effects were accounted for, deforestation rates in timber concessions and protected areas were not significantly different (Mean difference: 0.35 ha; 95% C.I.: -0.002 ha-0.7 ha).Natural forest timber concessions in Kalimantan had similar ability as protected areas to maintain forest cover during 2000-2010, provided the former were not reclassified to industrial plantation concessions. Our study indicates the desirability of the Government of Indonesia designating its natural forest timber concessions as protected areas under the IUCN Protected Area Category VI to protect them from reclassification.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
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