Isolated low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol are associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease : an individual participant data meta-analysis of 23 studies in the Asia-Pacific Region

Huxley, Rachel R., Barzi, Federica, Lam, Tai Hing, Czernichow, Sebastien, Fang, Xianghua, Welborn, Tim, Shaw, Jonathan, Ueshima, Hirotsugu, Zimmet, Paul, Jee, Sun Ha, Patel, Jeetesh V., Caterson, Ian, Perkovic, Vlado and Woodward, Mark (2011) Isolated low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol are associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease : an individual participant data meta-analysis of 23 studies in the Asia-Pacific Region. Circulation, 124 19: 2056-2064. doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.111.028373


Author Huxley, Rachel R.
Barzi, Federica
Lam, Tai Hing
Czernichow, Sebastien
Fang, Xianghua
Welborn, Tim
Shaw, Jonathan
Ueshima, Hirotsugu
Zimmet, Paul
Jee, Sun Ha
Patel, Jeetesh V.
Caterson, Ian
Perkovic, Vlado
Woodward, Mark
Title Isolated low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol are associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease : an individual participant data meta-analysis of 23 studies in the Asia-Pacific Region
Journal name Circulation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0009-7322
1524-4539
Publication date 2011-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.111.028373
Volume 124
Issue 19
Start page 2056
End page 2064
Total pages 9
Place of publication Baltimore MD, United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Language eng
Abstract Background-: Previous studies have suggested that there is a novel dyslipidemic profile consisting of isolated low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level that is associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease, and that this trait may be especially prevalent in Asian populations. Methods and Results-: Individual participant data from 220 060 participants (87% Asian) in 37 studies from the Asia-Pacific region were included. Low HDL-C (HDL <1.03 mmol/L in men and <1.30 mmol/L in women) was seen among 33.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 32.9-33.3) of Asians versus 27.0% (95% CI, 26.5-27.5) of non-Asians (P<0.001). The prevalence of low HDL-C in the absence of other lipid abnormalities (isolated low HDL-C) was higher in Asians compared with non-Asians: 22.4% (95% CI, 22.2-22.5) versus 14.5% (95% CI, 14.1-14.9), respectively (P<0.001). During 6.8 years of follow-up, there were 574 coronary heart disease and 739 stroke events. There was an inverse relationship between low HDL-C with coronary heart disease in all individuals (hazard ratio, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.31-1.87). In Asians, isolated low levels of HDL-C were as strongly associated with coronary heart disease risk as low levels of HDL-C combined with other lipid abnormalities (hazard ratio, 1.67 [95% CI, 1.27-2.19] versus 1.63 [95% CI, 1.24-2.15], respectively). There was no association between low HDL-C and stroke risk in this population (hazard ratio, 0.95 [95% CI, 0.78 to 1.17] with nonisolated low HDL-C and 0.81 [95% CI, 0.67-1.00] with isolated low HDL-C). Conclusion-: Isolated low HDL-C is a novel lipid phenotype that appears to be more prevalent among Asian populations, in whom it is associated with increased coronary risk. Further investigation into this type of dyslipidemia is warranted.
Keyword Cardiovascular diseases
Cholesterol
Epidemiology
Low hdl-cholesterol
Nutrition examination survey
Pan-european survey
Metabolic syndrome
Cardiovascular disease
National health
High prevalence
Follow up
Men
Collaboration
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes Document includes 18 supplemental pages.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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