Blood lipid levels, lipid-lowering medications, and the incidence of atrial fibrillation : the atherosclerosis risk in communities study

Lopez, Faye L., Agarwal, Sunil K., MacLehose, Richard F., Soliman, Elsayed Z., Sharrett, A. Richey, Huxley, Rachel R., Konety, Suma, Ballantyne, Christie M. and Alonso, Alvaro (2012) Blood lipid levels, lipid-lowering medications, and the incidence of atrial fibrillation : the atherosclerosis risk in communities study. Circulation : Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, 5 1: 155-162. doi:10.1161/CIRCEP.111.966804


Author Lopez, Faye L.
Agarwal, Sunil K.
MacLehose, Richard F.
Soliman, Elsayed Z.
Sharrett, A. Richey
Huxley, Rachel R.
Konety, Suma
Ballantyne, Christie M.
Alonso, Alvaro
Title Blood lipid levels, lipid-lowering medications, and the incidence of atrial fibrillation : the atherosclerosis risk in communities study
Journal name Circulation : Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1941-3149
1941-3084
Publication date 2012-02
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1161/CIRCEP.111.966804
Volume 5
Issue 1
Start page 155
End page 162
Total pages 8
Place of publication Philadelphia PA, United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Language eng
Abstract Background-Several cardiovascular risk factors have been associated with the risk of atrial fibrillation (AF). Limited and inconsistent evidence exists on the association of blood lipid levels and lipid-lowering medication use with AF risk. Methods and Results-We analyzed 13 969 participants (25% African American, 45% men) free of AF at baseline from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study. Fasting high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc), triglycerides, and total cholesterol were measured at baseline (1987-1989) and each of 3 follow-up visits. The incidence of AF was ascertained through 2007. The association of the use of statins and other lipid-lowering medications with AF was estimated in 13 044 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities participants attending visit 2 (1990 -1992), adjusting for covariates from the previous visit. During a median follow-up of 18.7 years, there were 1433 incident AF cases. Multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs of AF associated with a 1-SD increase in lipid levels were as follows: HDLc, 0.97 (0.91-1.04); LDLc, 0.90 (0.85- 0.96); total cholesterol, 0.89 (0.84-0.95); and triglycerides, 1.00 (0.96 -1.04). Participants taking lipid-lowering medications had an adjusted HR (95% CI) of AF of 0.96 (0.82-1.13) compared with those not taking medications, whereas those taking statins had an adjusted HR of 0.91 (0.66 -1.25) compared with those taking other lipid-lowering medications. Conclusions-Higher levels of LDLc and total cholesterol were associated with a lower incidence of AF. However, HDLc and triglycerides were not independently associated with AF incidence. No association was found between the use of lipid-lowering medications and incident AF.
Keyword Lipids
Epidemiology
Atrial Fibrillation
Statins
Niigata Preventive Medicine
Metabolic syndrome
African Americans
Follow up
Disease
Adults
Cholesterol
Stroke
Impact
Metaanalysis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes Published online before print January 6, 2012

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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