Languages, linguistic groups and status relations at Doomadgee, an Aboriginal settlement in northwest Queensland, Australia

Trigger, D. S. (1987) Languages, linguistic groups and status relations at Doomadgee, an Aboriginal settlement in northwest Queensland, Australia. Oceania, 57 3: 217-238.

Author Trigger, D. S.
Title Languages, linguistic groups and status relations at Doomadgee, an Aboriginal settlement in northwest Queensland, Australia
Journal name Oceania   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0029-8077
1834-4461
Publication date 1987-03-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 57
Issue 3
Start page 217
End page 238
Total pages 22
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Language eng
Formatted abstract
In this paper, I discuss two major dimensions of Aboriginal affiliation to languages, language names and linguistic territories: firstly, the extent to which this aspect of social identity entails the operation of linguistic groups; and secondly, the extent to which it entails the status situation of people. While the first issue is the less straightforward, and therefore discussion of it takes up most of the paper, both issues have been an important part of a broader study of sociopolitical life at Doomadgee (Trigger 1985), an Aboriginal settlement in far north-west Queensland, Australia (see Map 1).

The paper first treats the designation by contemporary Aborigines of linguistic territories as fundamental conceptual correlates of persons' linguistic affiliations. I then consider affiliation to such territories and to their associated languages and language names, via inheritance through descent; closely tied to this issue is the extent of linguistic endogamy, and rules for inheritance of linguistic affiliation in the case of linguistically exogamous unions. The paper then proceeds to a discussion of whether those with the same socially recognized linguistic affiliation engage in collective social action, and I deal in this context with both the residential discreteness of language-affiliated groupings and their behaviour as political interest groups. In the final section of the paper, I will present data concerning linguistic affiliation as an aspect of the status situation of people.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Social Science Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 09 Sep 2013, 10:56:44 EST by Debbie Lim on behalf of School of Social Science