Sharing stories: using narratives to illustrate the role of critical reflection in practice with First Australians

Booth, Jodie and Nelson, Alison (2013) Sharing stories: using narratives to illustrate the role of critical reflection in practice with First Australians. Occupational Therapy International, 20 3: 114-123. doi:10.1002/oti.1343


Author Booth, Jodie
Nelson, Alison
Title Sharing stories: using narratives to illustrate the role of critical reflection in practice with First Australians
Journal name Occupational Therapy International   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0966-7903
1557-0703
Publication date 2013-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/oti.1343
Volume 20
Issue 3
Start page 114
End page 123
Total pages 10
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This paper aims to fill a gap in existing literature by using examples of reflective practice and how these informed service delivery and development with First Australians within a population health paradigm. Population-based approaches have been proposed as useful for providing services that reach beyond the individual. They may be particularly helpful in providing a framework for occupational therapists working with First Australians, when modified appropriately.

“Healthy Ears” is a statewide ear health programme for First Australians. It is an example of a health promotion programme working to partner with First Australian communities using a community-driven and strengths-based approach. The occupational therapy role within this service has been recently established. Collaborative autoethnography was used to produce narrative reflection and discussion between the first and second authors in order to illustrate the role of critical reflection in developing this new occupational therapy service. The narratives presented are based on three main themes, which emerged as important guiding principles; these are core occupational therapy knowledge and skills, partnerships with communities and organizations and cultural safety. Each theme comprises narrative excerpts followed by interpretations based on the literature.

The findings from these narratives, whilst limited to a particular context, suggest there is a need for greater professional preparation and support for occupational therapists working cross-culturally through undergraduate training and professional development opportunities. This paper highlights the usefulness of reflective practice as a tool for developing culturally safe occupational therapy services and emphasizes the importance of relationships with key First Australians as a platform for culturally safe practice.
Keyword Australian Indigenous people
Reflective practice
Occupational therapy and culture
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Sun, 08 Sep 2013, 00:10:46 EST by System User on behalf of Office of Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Indigenous Engmt)