Evaluation of reduced-tillering (tin) wheat lines in managed, terminal water deficit environments

Mitchell, J. H., Rebetzke, G. J., Chapman, S. C. and Fukai, S. (2013) Evaluation of reduced-tillering (tin) wheat lines in managed, terminal water deficit environments. Journal of Experimental Botany, 64 11: 3439-3451. doi:10.1093/jxb/ert181


Author Mitchell, J. H.
Rebetzke, G. J.
Chapman, S. C.
Fukai, S.
Title Evaluation of reduced-tillering (tin) wheat lines in managed, terminal water deficit environments
Formatted title
Evaluation of reduced-tillering (tin) wheat lines in managed, terminal water deficit environments
Journal name Journal of Experimental Botany   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-0957
1460-2431
Publication date 2013-08
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/jxb/ert181
Volume 64
Issue 11
Start page 3439
End page 3451
Total pages 13
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Oxford University Press
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Small or shrivelled wheat kernels (screenings) that reduce crop value are commonly produced in terminal drought environments. The aim of this study was to establish whether the incorporation of the tiller inhibition (tin) gene would contribute to maintenance of kernel weight and reductions in screenings under terminal water deficit. Five Silverstar near-isogenic lines contrasting in high and low tiller potential and their recurrent Silverstar parent were established at two plant densities under managed terminal water deficit (mild and severe) and irrigated conditions. With irrigation (grain yield of 5.6 t ha–1), kernels of all lines weighed ~31mg, with restricted-tillering (R-tin) lines producing an average 15% lower grain yield. Under both mild and severe terminal water deficit (4.1 t ha–1 and 2.8 t ha–1), free-tillering lines had relatively high screenings ranging from 11.9% to 16.2%. Compared with free-tillering lines, R-tin lines maintained large kernel weight (~29mg kernel–1) and had 29% and 51% fewer screenings under the two stresses, and a significantly greater (+11%) grain yield under mild stress. Higher kernel weights in tin lines were realized even with the greater kernel number per spike. The higher kernel weight of the R-tin lines under stress conditions was associated with greater anthesis biomass and increased stem water-soluble carbohydrates, ensuring more assimilate for later translocation to filling grain. The incorporation of the tin gene into genetic material adapted to the target environments provides scope for improvement in both grain yield and kernel weight, and a reduction in screenings in terminal water deficit environments.
Keyword Dryland agriculture
Grain size
Tiller inhibition gene
Water-soluble carbohydrate
Water stress
Yield
Grain-yield
Mediterranean environment
Spring wheat
Growth
Cultivars
Traits
Barley
Gene
Genotypes
Patterns
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Official 2014 Collection
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 11 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 13 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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