Continuing professional development in mental health professions: does it really make a difference?

Rossouw, Pieter J. and Hatty, Melissa A. (2013). Continuing professional development in mental health professions: does it really make a difference?. In: Book of Proceedings. Opening Doors. The 14th International Mental Health Conference 2013. 14th International Mental Health Conference, Surfers Paradise, QLD, Australia, (126-145). 5-7 August, 2013.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Rossouw, Pieter J.
Hatty, Melissa A.
Title of paper Continuing professional development in mental health professions: does it really make a difference?
Conference name 14th International Mental Health Conference
Conference location Surfers Paradise, QLD, Australia
Conference dates 5-7 August, 2013
Proceedings title Book of Proceedings. Opening Doors. The 14th International Mental Health Conference 2013
Place of Publication Nerang, QLD, Australia
Publisher Australian and New Zealand Mental Health Association
Publication Year 2013
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9781922232069
Start page 126
End page 145
Total pages 20
Chapter number 10
Total chapters 14
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Continuing professional development (CPD) is standard practice across many mental health professions. Through CPD activities, mental health professionals are afforded opportunities to advance their knowledge, skills, and understanding of a diversity of treatment approaches, in turn fostering the incorporation of science into clinical practice and supporting the use of evidence-based practices (Belar & Perry, 1992; Bloom, 2005; Psychology Board of Australia, 2012). Participation in CPD also assists practitioners in keeping up-to-date with scientific developments, facilitating greater understanding of client care processes and health outcomes, and enhancing practitioners' ability to adapt to the changing needs of clients (Bloom, 2005; Psychology Board of Australia, 2012).

For Australian psychologists, participation in CPD is a mandatory requirement for renewal of registration. The Psychology Board of Australia utilises a self-directed and selfregulatory CPD model that emphasises psychologists' assessment, monitoring, and evaluation of their own developmental needs. Encompassed in this model is the expectation that psychologists assess their existing knowledge, skills, and competence, develop, monitor, and reflect upon their individual learning plan, and evaluate the quality of CPD activities and learning outcomes in light of their individual learning objectives (Psychology Board of Australia, 2010, 2011, 2012). While not required to submit evidence of CPD participation when renewing their registration, psychologists are required to maintain a CPD portfolio that may be audited at any time (Psychology Board of Australia, 2011).

Through participation in CPD, psychologists are afforded a means by which to refine, advance, and retain skills and knowledge and to develop specialities of practice (Elman, Illfelder-Kaye, & Robiner, 2005; Psychology Board of Australia, 2011). As an essential component of professional psychology that continues throughout a psychologist's career, a core aim of CPD is to improve clinical practice, enhance client care, and maximise clinical outcomes (Psychology Board of Australia, 2012).
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Created: Thu, 05 Sep 2013, 09:20:10 EST by Pieter Rossouw on behalf of School of Psychology