Service use for mental health problems in people with delusional-like experiences: a nationwide population based survey.

Saha, Sukanta, McGrath, John and Scott, James (2013) Service use for mental health problems in people with delusional-like experiences: a nationwide population based survey.. PLoS ONE, 8 8: e71951.1-e71951.6. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0071951


Author Saha, Sukanta
McGrath, John
Scott, James
Title Service use for mental health problems in people with delusional-like experiences: a nationwide population based survey.
Journal name PLoS ONE   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2013-08-21
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0071951
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 8
Issue 8
Start page e71951.1
End page e71951.6
Total pages 6
Place of publication San Francisco, CA, United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective Previous population-based studies have found that delusional-like experiences (DLEs) are prevalent in the community, and are associated with a wide range of mental health disorders. The aim of the study was to investigate mental health service use by people with DLEs.

Methods Subjects were drawn from the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing 2007 of 8 841community residents aged between 16 and 85 years. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) was used to identify DLEs. Service utilization was assessed using a module that elicited information about hospital admissions, consultations with various health professionals, and prescription medication use. This study focussed on service use for mental health problems. We used logistic regression to examine the association, adjusting for potential confounding factors.

Results Of 8 773 included participants, 8.4% (n = 776) positively endorsed one or more DLEs. With respect to consultations for mental health needs, individuals who endorsed DLEs were more likely to consult health professionals compared with those who did not endorse DLEs. Individuals with DLEs were also more likely to use prescription medicine. When we repeated the main analysis in a subgroup excluding any CIDI diagnosis of mental health disorders the results remained largely unchanged.

Conclusions DLEs are common in the general population, and individuals with DLEs have an increased rate of accessing services for their mental health needs. Individuals endorsing both DLEs and increased help-seeking may identify a group of vulnerable people who have increased risk of developing psychotic illnesses later in life. This needs closer scrutiny in longitudinal prospective studies.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 04 Sep 2013, 20:51:34 EST by James Scott on behalf of Psychiatry - Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital