Consultations with complementary and alternative medicine practitioners amongst wider care options for back pain: a study of a nationally representative sample of 1,310 Australian women aged 60–65 years

Murthy, Vijayendra, Sibbritt, David, Adams, Jon, Broom, Alex, Kirby, Emma and Refshuage, Kathryn M. (2013) Consultations with complementary and alternative medicine practitioners amongst wider care options for back pain: a study of a nationally representative sample of 1,310 Australian women aged 60–65 years. Clinical Rheumatology, 33 2: 253-262. doi:10.1007/s10067-013-2357-5

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Author Murthy, Vijayendra
Sibbritt, David
Adams, Jon
Broom, Alex
Kirby, Emma
Refshuage, Kathryn M.
Title Consultations with complementary and alternative medicine practitioners amongst wider care options for back pain: a study of a nationally representative sample of 1,310 Australian women aged 60–65 years
Journal name Clinical Rheumatology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0770-3198
1434-9949
Publication date 2013-08-15
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10067-013-2357-5
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 33
Issue 2
Start page 253
End page 262
Total pages 10
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Springer U K
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Back pain is a significant health service issue in Australia and internationally. Back pain sufferers can draw upon a range of health care providers including complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners. Women are higher users of health services than men and tend to use CAM frequently for musculoskeletal conditions. However, there remain important gaps in our understanding of women’s consultation patterns with CAM practitioners for back pain. The objective of this study is to examine the prevalence of use and characteristics of women who use CAM practitioners for back pain. The method used was a survey of a nationally representative sample of women aged 60–65 years from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health. Women consulted a massage therapist (44.1 %, n = 578) and a chiropractor (37.3 %, n = 488) more than other CAM practitioners for their back pain. Consultations with a chiropractor for back pain were lower for women who consulted a General Practitioner (GP) (OR, 0.56; 95 % CI 0.41, 0.76) or a physiotherapist (OR, 0.53; 95 % CI 0.39, 0.72) than for those who did not consult a GP or a physiotherapist. CAM practitioner consultations for back pain were greater for women who visited a pharmacist (OR, 1.99; 95 % CI 1.23, 3.32) than for women who did not visit a pharmacist. There is substantial use of CAM practitioners alongside conventional practitioners amongst women for back pain, and there is a need to provide detailed examination of the communication between patients and their providers as well as across the diverse range of health professionals involved in back pain care.
Keyword Back pain
Complementary and alternative medicine
Health care utilization
Women
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 15 August 2013

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Social Science Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 04 Sep 2013, 11:56:10 EST by Mary Anne Patton on behalf of School of Social Science