Dingoes at the doorstep: preliminary data on the ecology of dingoes in urban areas

Allen, Benjamin L., Goullet, Mark, Allen, Lee R., Lisle, Allan and Leung, Kui-Po (Luke) (2013) Dingoes at the doorstep: preliminary data on the ecology of dingoes in urban areas. Landscape and Urban Planning, 119 131-135. doi:10.1016/j.landurbplan.2013.07.008


Author Allen, Benjamin L.
Goullet, Mark
Allen, Lee R.
Lisle, Allan
Leung, Kui-Po (Luke)
Title Dingoes at the doorstep: preliminary data on the ecology of dingoes in urban areas
Journal name Landscape and Urban Planning   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0169-2046
1872-6062
Publication date 2013-11
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.landurbplan.2013.07.008
Open Access Status
Volume 119
Start page 131
End page 135
Total pages 5
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Highlights
• Dingoes are present in most large cities and towns in Australia.
• Dingoes regularly traverse backyards, school grounds, parkland and green zones.
• Urban dingoes may present significant social, economic and environmental impacts.
• Urban dingoes may contribute to human health and safety risks in urban areas.
• Urban planners and wildlife managers need more information on urban dingo ecology.

Wild carnivores are becoming increasing common in urban areas. In Australia, dingoes exist, in most large cities and towns within their extended range. However, little empirical data is available to inform dingo management or address potential dingo–human conflicts during urban planning. From GPS tracking data, the nine dingoes, predominately juvenile and female, we tracked lived within 700 m of residential homes at all times and frequently crossed roads, visited backyards and traversed built-up areas. Home range sizes ranged between 0.37 km2 and 100.32 km2. Dingoes were mostly nocturnal, averaging 591 m/h between dusk and dawn. Juvenile and adult dingoes spent up to 19% and 72% of their time in urban habitats. Fresh scats from most areas surveyed tested positive to a variety of common zoonoses. These data suggest dingoes are capable of exploiting peri-urban areas and might contribute to human health and safety risks, the significance of which remains unknown.
Keyword Canis lupus dingo
Epidemiology
Landscape ecology
Tapeworm
Urban wildlife
Wild dog
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Official 2014 Collection
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 8 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 10 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 02 Sep 2013, 10:58:02 EST by Dr Luke Leung on behalf of School of Agriculture and Food Sciences