Further shrinking the malaria map: how can geospatial science help to achieve malaria elimination?

Clements, Archie C. A., Reid, Heidi L., Kelly, Gerard C. and Hay, Simon I. (2013) Further shrinking the malaria map: how can geospatial science help to achieve malaria elimination?. Lancet Infectious Diseases, 13 8: 709-718. doi:10.1016/S1473-3099(13)70140-3


Author Clements, Archie C. A.
Reid, Heidi L.
Kelly, Gerard C.
Hay, Simon I.
Title Further shrinking the malaria map: how can geospatial science help to achieve malaria elimination?
Journal name Lancet Infectious Diseases   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1473-3099
1474-4457
Publication date 2013-08
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/S1473-3099(13)70140-3
Volume 13
Issue 8
Start page 709
End page 718
Total pages 10
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher The Lancet Publishing Group
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Malaria is one of the biggest contributors to deaths caused by infectious disease. More than 30 countries have planned or started programmes to target malaria elimination, often with explicit support from international donors. The spatial distribution of malaria, at all levels of endemicity, is heterogeneous. Moreover, populations living in low-endemic settings where elimination efforts might be targeted are often spatially heterogeneous. Geospatial methods, therefore, can help design, target, monitor, and assess malaria elimination programmes. Rapid advances in technology and analytical methods have allowed the spatial prediction of malaria risk and the development of spatial decision support systems, which can enhance elimination programmes by enabling accurate and timely resource allocation. However, no framework exists for assessment of geospatial instruments. Research is needed to identify measurable indicators of elimination progress and to quantify the effect of geospatial methods in achievement of elimination outcomes.
Keyword Geographic information-systems
Dominant Anopheles vectors
East-african highlands
Bionomic precis
Climate-change
Spatial-distribution
Environmental data
Transmission risk
Satellite imagery
Decision-support
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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