Direct urine polymerase chain reaction for chlamydia and gonorrhoea: a simple means of bringing high-throughput rapid testing to remote settings?

Rahimi, Frashta, Goire, Namraj, Guy, Rebecca, Kaldor, John M., Ward, James, Nissen, Michael D., Sloots, Theo P. and Whiley, David M. (2013) Direct urine polymerase chain reaction for chlamydia and gonorrhoea: a simple means of bringing high-throughput rapid testing to remote settings?. Sexual Health, 10 4: 299-304. doi:10.1071/SH12108


Author Rahimi, Frashta
Goire, Namraj
Guy, Rebecca
Kaldor, John M.
Ward, James
Nissen, Michael D.
Sloots, Theo P.
Whiley, David M.
Title Direct urine polymerase chain reaction for chlamydia and gonorrhoea: a simple means of bringing high-throughput rapid testing to remote settings?
Journal name Sexual Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1448-5028
1449-8987
Publication date 2013
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/SH12108
Volume 10
Issue 4
Start page 299
End page 304
Total pages 6
Place of publication Collingwood VIC, Austalia
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background Rapid point-of-care tests (POCTs) for chlamydia (Chlamydia trachomatis) and gonorrhoea (Neisseria gonorrhoeae) have the potential to confer health benefits in certain populations even at moderate sensitivities; however, suitable POCTs for these organisms are currently lacking.
Methods: In this study, we investigated the use of direct urine polymerase chain reaction (PCR), with the view of implementing a simplified PCR strategy for high-throughput chlamydia and gonorrhoea screening in remote settings. Briefly, a simple dilution of the urine was performed before adding it directly to a real-time PCR reaction. The method was evaluated using 134 stored urine specimens that had been submitted for chlamydia and gonorrhoea testing and had been tested using a commercial C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae PCR method. These included samples that were PCR-positive for chlamydia (n≤87), gonorrhoea (n≤16) or both (n≤2). Direct urine testing was conducted using previously described in-house real-time PCR methods for C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae as well as for recognised N.gonorrhoeae antimicrobial resistance mechanisms. Results: The overall sensitivities and specificities of the direct urine PCR were 78% and 100% for chlamydia, and 83% and 100% for gonorrhoea. N.gonorrhoeae penicillin and quinolone resistance mechanisms were characterised in 14 of the 18 N. gonorrhoeae-positive samples.
Conclusions: The results of this study show that the simplified PCR strategy may be a feasible approach for rapid screening and improving chlamydia and gonorrhoea treatment in remote settings.
Keyword Penicillin resistance
Quinone resistance
Rapid point of care
Neisseria Gonorrhoeae
Trachomatis
Assay
Communities
Diagnosis
Point
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 01 Sep 2013, 00:06:44 EST by System User on behalf of Clinical Medical Virology Centre