Proline and arginine accumulation in developing berries of Vitis vinifera L. in Australian vineyards: Influence of vine cultivar, berry maturity and tissue type

Stines, A. P., Grubb, J., Gockowiak, H., Henschke, P. A., Høj P. B. and van Heeswijck. R. (2000) Proline and arginine accumulation in developing berries of Vitis vinifera L. in Australian vineyards: Influence of vine cultivar, berry maturity and tissue type. Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research, 6 2: 150-158.

Author Stines, A. P.
Grubb, J.
Gockowiak, H.
Henschke, P. A.
Høj P. B.
van Heeswijck. R.
Title Proline and arginine accumulation in developing berries of Vitis vinifera L. in Australian vineyards: Influence of vine cultivar, berry maturity and tissue type
Formatted title
 Proline and arginine accumulation in developing berries of Vitis vinifera L. in Australian vineyards: Influence of vine cultivar, berry maturity and tissue type
Journal name Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1322-7130
1755-0238
Publication date 2000-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 6
Issue 2
Start page 150
End page 158
Total pages 9
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Language eng
Abstract Using HPLC analysis, free amino acid profiles were obtained for ripe berries of six grapevine cultivars (Cabernet Sauvignon, Grenache, Muscat Gordo, Pinot Noir, Riesling and Sangiovese) grown under comparable conditions and harvested at similar maturities. Compositional differences were observed between cultivars, however proline and arginine were always the major amino acids. Mature berries of Cabernet Sauvignon contained a very high concentration of proline, but a much lower concentration of arginine. Those of other cultivars contained moderate levels of both arginine and proline. Changes in free amino acid profiles during grape berry development were further investigated in four cultivars (Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Gewurztraminer and Muscat Gordo). In all cases, most of the proline accumulation occurred late in ripening, around four weeks post-veraison. In contrast, arginine accumulation began before veraison and continued to full maturity, except for those cultivars in which a high concentration of proline accumulated, in which case the concentration of arginine reached a plateau relatively early in development. Accumulation of both proline and arginine appears to be developmentally regulated. These observations are discussed with reference to proline and arginine metabolism and possible links between them. The distribution of free proline, arginine and other amino acids amongst pulp, skin and seed was examined using mature fruit of Cabernet Sauvignon and Riesling. Amino acid profiles were found to vary considerably between the berry components. The skin contained a greater ratio of arginine:proline compared with the pulp. This suggests that the yeast-assimilable nitrogen content of juices, and therefore their fermentability, could be enhanced in the presence of skins.
Keyword Amino acids
Arginine
Fruit development
Grapevine
Metabolism
Proline
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Office of the Vice-Chancellor
 
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Created: Tue, 27 Aug 2013, 21:11:30 EST by Anthony Yeates on behalf of Office of the Vice-Chancellor