Effect of fetal and child health on kidney development and long-term risk of hypertension and kidney disease

Luyckx, Valerie A., Bertram, John F., Brenner, Barry M., Fall, Caroline, Hoy, Wendy E., Ozanne, Susan E. and Vikse, Bjorn E. (2013) Effect of fetal and child health on kidney development and long-term risk of hypertension and kidney disease. Lancet, 382 9888: 273-283. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(13)60311-6

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Author Luyckx, Valerie A.
Bertram, John F.
Brenner, Barry M.
Fall, Caroline
Hoy, Wendy E.
Ozanne, Susan E.
Vikse, Bjorn E.
Title Effect of fetal and child health on kidney development and long-term risk of hypertension and kidney disease
Journal name Lancet   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0140-6736
1474-547X
Publication date 2013-07
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/S0140-6736(13)60311-6
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 382
Issue 9888
Start page 273
End page 283
Total pages 11
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Lancet Publishing
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Abstract Summary Developmental programming of non-communicable diseases is now an established paradigm. With respect to hypertension and chronic kidney disease, adverse events experienced in utero can affect development of the fetal kidney and reduce final nephron number. Low birthweight and prematurity are the most consistent clinical surrogates for a low nephron number and are associated with increased risk of hypertension, proteinuria, and kidney disease in later life. Rapid weight gain in childhood or adolescence further compounds these risks. Low birthweight, prematurity, and rapid childhood weight gain should alert clinicians to an individual's lifelong risk of hypertension and kidney disease, prompting education to minimise additional risk factors and ensuring follow-up. Birthweight and prematurity are affected substantially by maternal nutrition and health during pregnancy. Optimisation of maternal health and early childhood nutrition could, therefore, attenuate this programming cycle and reduce the global burden of hypertension and kidney disease in the future.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 31 May 2013.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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