Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation temporarily reverses age-associated cognitive decline and functional brain activity changes

Meinzer, Marcus, Lindenberg, Robert, Antonenko, Daria, Flaisch, Tobias and Flöel, Agnes (2013) Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation temporarily reverses age-associated cognitive decline and functional brain activity changes. Journal of Neuroscience, 33 30: 12470-12478a. doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.5743-12.2013

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Author Meinzer, Marcus
Lindenberg, Robert
Antonenko, Daria
Flaisch, Tobias
Flöel, Agnes
Title Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation temporarily reverses age-associated cognitive decline and functional brain activity changes
Journal name Journal of Neuroscience   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0270-6474
1529-2401
Publication date 2013-07-24
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.5743-12.2013
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 33
Issue 30
Start page 12470
End page 12478a
Total pages 10
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher Society for Neuroscience
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The rising proportion of elderly people worldwide will yield an increased incidence of age-associated cognitive impairments, imposing major burdens on societies. Consequently, growing interest emerged to evaluate new strategies to delay or counteract cognitive decline in aging. Here, we assessed immediate effects of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (atDCS) on cognition and previously described detrimental changes in brain activity attributable to aging. Twenty healthy elderly adults were assessed in a crossover sham-controlled design using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and concurrent transcranial DCS administered to the left inferior frontal gyrus. Effects on performance and task-related brain activity were evaluated during overt semantic word generation, a task that is negatively affected by advanced age. Task-absent resting-state fMRI (RS-fMRI) assessed atDCS-induced changes at the network level independent of performance. Twenty matched younger adults served as controls. During sham stimulation, task-related fMRI demonstrated that enhanced bilateral prefrontal activity in older adults was associated with reduced performance. RS-fMRI revealed enhanced anterior and reduced posterior functional brain connectivity. atDCS significantly improved performance in older adults up to the level of younger controls; significantly reduced task-related hyperactivity in bilateral prefrontal cortices, the anterior cingulate gyrus, and the precuneus; and induced a more “youth-like” connectivity pattern during RS-fMRI. Our results provide converging evidence from behavioral analysis and two independent functional imaging paradigms that a single session of atDCS can temporarily reverse nonbeneficial effects of aging on cognition and brain activity and connectivity. These findings may translate into novel treatments to ameliorate cognitive decline in normal aging in the future.
Keyword Working-memory
Older-adults
Healthy-individuals
Cortex stimulation
Motor cortex
Connectivity
State
Task
Facilitation
Plasticity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2014 Collection
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 60 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 67 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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