A dual process model of attitudes towards immigration: person x residential area effects in a national sample

Sibley, Chris G., Duckitt, John, Bergh, Robin, Osborne, Danny, Perry, Ryan, Asbrock, Frank, Robertson, Andrew, Armstrong, Gavin, Wilson, Marc Stewart and Barlow, Fiona Kate (2013) A dual process model of attitudes towards immigration: person x residential area effects in a national sample. Political Psychology, 34 4: 553-572. doi:10.1111/pops.12009


Author Sibley, Chris G.
Duckitt, John
Bergh, Robin
Osborne, Danny
Perry, Ryan
Asbrock, Frank
Robertson, Andrew
Armstrong, Gavin
Wilson, Marc Stewart
Barlow, Fiona Kate
Title A dual process model of attitudes towards immigration: person x residential area effects in a national sample
Formatted title
A dual process model of attitudes towards immigration: person × residential area effects in a national sample
Journal name Political Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0162-895X
1467-9221
Publication date 2013-08
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/pops.12009
Volume 34
Issue 4
Start page 553
End page 572
Total pages 20
Place of publication United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This research took a person × situation approach to predicting prejudice by looking at how social worldviews interact with real-world environmental factors to predict how people respond to immigrants within their local area. Taking a Dual Process Motivational approach, we hypothesized that a higher proportion of immigrants in the local community would be associated with negative attitudes toward immigration for respondents high in dangerous world beliefs. Conversely, we hypothesized that living in a highly affluent (as opposed to socioeconomically deprived) community would be associated with negative attitudes toward immigration for respondents high in competitive world beliefs. Both hypotheses were supported using regional information derived from national census data combined with representative survey data from a large telephone sample conducted in New Zealand (N = 6,489). These findings support the proposition that individual differences interact with specific features of the environment to predict people's levels of prejudice in distinct ways.
Keyword Social worldviews
Person x situation
Immigrant density
Regional deprivation
Immigration
Social-dominance orientation
Right-wing authoritarianism
Process motivational model
Ideological attitudes
Generalized prejudice
Intergroup contact
Perceived threat
Big 5
Metaanalysis
Competition
Person × situation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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