Third-party disability in family members of people with aphasia: a systematic review

Grawburg, Meghann, Howe, Tami, Worrall, Linda and Scarinci, Nerina (2013) Third-party disability in family members of people with aphasia: a systematic review. Disability and Rehabilitation, 35 16: 1324-1341. doi:10.3109/09638288.2012.735341


Author Grawburg, Meghann
Howe, Tami
Worrall, Linda
Scarinci, Nerina
Title Third-party disability in family members of people with aphasia: a systematic review
Journal name Disability and Rehabilitation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0963-8288
1464-5165
Publication date 2013-08
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.3109/09638288.2012.735341
Volume 35
Issue 16
Start page 1324
End page 1341
Total pages 18
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Informa Healthcare
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Purpose: The WHO’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) describes third-party disability as the disability experienced by significant others as a consequence of their family members’ health condition (WHO, 2001). A systematic review of the literature was conducted to summarize the current knowledge of third-party disability in aphasia.

Method: PubMed, CINAHL and three other databases were searched for peer-reviewed studies reporting on how aphasia affects family members with no date restrictions. Findings from relevant studies that met the inclusion criteria were extracted and mapped to the ICF.

Results: This paper summarizes what is known about the experience of family members of people with aphasia, describing negative outcomes in the body functions and activities and participation components of the ICF. However, due to the limited consensus between studies, this review reveals an incomplete understanding of the nature of third-party disability.

Conclusion: While current literature suggests there is a broad range of consequences for family members of people with aphasia, the sequelae of disability for family members of people with aphasia are not well understood. Further research is needed to better describe the nature and degree of third-party disability in aphasia.

Implications for Rehabilitation
• Third-party disability occurs when family members experience changes to their functioning as a consequence of their significant other’s health condition (e.g. aphasia), even though they do not have the condition themselves.
• Aphasia has widespread impact on the family members of people with aphasia, including negative effects on their body functions, activities and participation.
• Future research using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health is needed to guide rehabilitation professionals when providing family-centred care to people with aphasia and their family members.
Keyword ICF
Informal caregivers
Stroke
Quality-of-life
Stroke survivors
International classification
Language pathologists
Environmental-factors
Hearing impairment
Primary caregivers
Adaptation process
Significant others
Informal carers
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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