The efficacy of outpatient and community-based aphasia group interventions: a systematic review

Lanyon, Lucette E., Rose, Miranda L. and Worrall, Linda (2013) The efficacy of outpatient and community-based aphasia group interventions: a systematic review. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 15 4: 359-374. doi:10.3109/17549507.2012.752865


Author Lanyon, Lucette E.
Rose, Miranda L.
Worrall, Linda
Title The efficacy of outpatient and community-based aphasia group interventions: a systematic review
Journal name International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1754-9507
1754-9515
Publication date 2013-08
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.3109/17549507.2012.752865
Volume 15
Issue 4
Start page 359
End page 374
Total pages 16
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Informa Healthcare
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This paper examines the evidence for community and outpatient aphasia groups using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework. A systematic search of the literature using eight electronic databases was completed; 29 studies met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Level of evidence and methodological quality was assessed and effect sizes calculated where possible. Evidence favouring community and outpatient groups centred on four level ii and level iii-i studies that examined the efficacy of highly structured group activities for improving specific linguistic processes with five medium–large effect sizes calculated. Medium and large effect sizes were also calculated on a level iii-i study examining number of friendships and community access. No effect sizes were available for level ii or level iii studies examining communication activity and participation. Overall, the results indicate that community and outpatient group participation can improve specific linguistic processes. There is also some evidence that group participation can benefit social networks and community access. However, there is limited evidence demonstrating improvement in functional communication as a consequence of group participation. The current evidence is not comprehensive. Further well-designed studies, particularly examining activity and participation, and contextual factors are required to advance community and outpatient aphasia group practice and participation.
Keyword Systematic review
Aphasia
Treatment
LCF
World Health Organization
Constraint-induced aphasia
Induced language therapy
Quality-of-life
Communication treatment
Stroke
Adults
Context
People
Rehabilitation
Participation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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