The ghost of parasites past: eggs of the blood fluke Cardicola chaetodontis (Aporocotylidae) trapped in the heart and gills of butterflyfishes (Perciformes: Chaetodontidae) of the Great Barrier Reef

Yong, R. Q-Y., Cutmore, S. C., Miller, T. L., Adlard, R. D. and Cribb, T. H. (2013) The ghost of parasites past: eggs of the blood fluke Cardicola chaetodontis (Aporocotylidae) trapped in the heart and gills of butterflyfishes (Perciformes: Chaetodontidae) of the Great Barrier Reef. Parasitology, 140 9: 1186-1194. doi:10.1017/S0031182013000681


Author Yong, R. Q-Y.
Cutmore, S. C.
Miller, T. L.
Adlard, R. D.
Cribb, T. H.
Title The ghost of parasites past: eggs of the blood fluke Cardicola chaetodontis (Aporocotylidae) trapped in the heart and gills of butterflyfishes (Perciformes: Chaetodontidae) of the Great Barrier Reef
Formatted title
The ghost of parasites past: eggs of the blood fluke Cardicola chaetodontis (Aporocotylidae) trapped in the heart and gills of butterflyfishes (Perciformes: Chaetodontidae) of the Great Barrier Reef
Journal name Parasitology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0031-1820
1469-8161
Publication date 2013-08
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0031182013000681
Volume 140
Issue 9
Start page 1186
End page 1194
Total pages 9
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
We explored the distribution of Cardicola chaetodontis in chaetodontid fishes from the Great Barrier Reef. We found just four infections of adult worms in 238 individuals of 26 chaetodontid species. By contrast, eggs were present in hearts of 75 fishes (31·5%) and 19 of 26 chaetodontid species (all Chaetodon species). In 10 cases eggs contained moving miracidia; all the others were dead and degenerating. Eggs were sought in the gills of 51 individual fish. There were 17 cases of eggs being present in gills while present in the heart, but also 13 cases where eggs were absent from gills but present in the heart, suggesting that eggs remain longer in heart tissue than in gills. ITS2 rDNA sequences from two adult worms and eggs extracted from gills of five fishes (all different species) were identical to previously reported sequences of C. chaetodontis except for a single base-pair difference in two samples. We conclude that aporocotylid eggs trapped in fish heart tissues may inform understanding of the distributions and host ranges of aporocotylids, especially where adult prevalence is low. The low host-specificity of C. chaetodontis contrasts with higher specificity of trematodes of chaetodontids that have trophic transmission.
Keyword Aporocotylidae
Bloodflukes
Eggs
Host-specificity
Butterflyfishes
Chaetodontidae
Southern bluefin tuna
Indo-west pacific
Host-specificity
Trematoda aporocotylidae
Thunnus-orientalis
Marine fish
Digenea
Sanguinicolidae
Teleostei
Taxonomy
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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